Autumn 2018

Please check Buckeyelink and/or refer to a course's home department for any questions about course topics, instructors, or schedules. You can find instructor contact information on the department's homepage or using the people find search engine on my.osu.edu.

If you have questions about major or minor requirements please see the advising sheets linked on this page or contact an advisor to assist you.

Moving-Image Production courses / Film Studies Undergraduate Major and Minor courses / Screenwriting Focus courses / Production Focus courses / Graduate Courses 

Moving-Image Production Major

PDF icon MIP Advising Guide 2018.pdf

 

ACCAD 5002   3D Computer Animation: Form, Light, and Motion 1

This entry-level course presents moving image production as an artistic, cultural, and multi-modal practice. It focuses on the building blocks of film grammar and offers an introduction to fundamental concepts and tools needed to work in the moving image, grounded in critical and historical context. Students use project-based learning to work independently and collaboratively.

  • Class 13795/ TuTh 11:10AM – 12:30PM / Sullivant Hall 349A / Stephen Conroy
  • Class 13796/ TuTh 11:10AM – 12:30PM / Sullivant Hall 349A / Stephen Conroy

 

ART 2555    Photography I - Digital Camera

Introduces photographic theory, practice, and aesthetics with image production, commercial lab prints and critiques. Student provides digital camera, minimum 6 mp, with full manual controls and exposure compensation available. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 300.01, 300.02, or 300.02H. GE VPA course. VSP Admis Cond course. Credit: 3 units

  • Class 4862 / Mo We Fr 8:05AM - 9:55AM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff
  • Class 4863 / Tu Th 8:10 AM- 10:55 AM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff
  • Class 4864 / Mo We Fr 10:05AM – 11:55AM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff
  • Class 4865 / Tu Th 11:10 AM- 1:55 PM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff
  • Class 4866/ Mo We Fr 12:05 AM – 1:55PM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff
  • Class 4867 / Mo We Fr 2:05 PM – 3:55PM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff
  • Class 4868 / Tu Th 3:55 PM- 6:40 PM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff
  • Class 13377 / Mo We 6:05 PM – 8:45PM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff
  • Class 19983 / Tu Th 6:55 PM- 9:40 PM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff

 

ART 5009  Film/Video III: Topics in Technologies and Strategies 

Special Topic : Expanded Cinema

This course seeks to challenge how we understand what movies are or can be, by exploding or fragmenting the space of the screen, exploring forms of audience participation and interactivity, projecting films “outside the box” of the theater or gallery, and much more.  We will explore all types of projection devices from magic lanterns and slide projectors to the latest in digital technologies.  The course will also include a substantial number of public events, both by internationally known artists and by the students in the class themselves. 

Film/Video III is a variable-topics course that focuses in on one set of strategies or technologies touched upon in Film/Video II, offering a much deeper engagement with that particular set of strategies. Prereq: 3009 and 4009. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

  • Class 33811 / Mo We 6:55PM - 9:40PM / Hopkins Hall 156 / Roger Beebe

 

DESIGN 3194  Group Studies: Hand-drawn Animation 

This course introduces various techniques and practices in animation, while focusing on the development and understanding of animation principles. The course will provide an overview of techniques ranging from hand-drawn cell animation, to stop motion and pixilation as it introduces animation as a tool for filmmakers to employ. Each class will consist of a short demonstration, references, hands-on experimentation, and critique. Weekly assignments will further the student’s exploration of animation practices and techniques, and they will learn basic post-production using Adobe Premiere and After Effects. The final project in the course is a group animation developed by each group independently in the creation of a short animated film. 

Designed as an introduction to animation course for the majors in Moving-Image Production. Studnets from other majors are encouraged to enroll. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 hours.

  • Class 34843 / Tu Th 12:45PM - 2:45PM / Denney Hall 0060 / Kyoung Swearingen

 

MVNGIMG 2201 - 0010   Filmmaking Foundation I

This entry-level course presents moving image production as an artistic, cultural, and multi-modal practice. It focuses on the building blocks of film grammar and offers an introduction to fundamental concepts and tools needed to work in the moving image, grounded in critical and historical context. Students use project-based learning to work independently and collaboratively.

  • Class 18103 (Lec) / Tu 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Hagerty Hall 180 / Roger Beebe
  • Class 18312 (Rec) / Mo 11:10- 1:55PM / Hagerty Hall 0150 / Staff
  • Class 18113(Rec) / Mo 3:55- 6:40PM / Hagerty Hall 0150 / Staff

 

THEATRE 3381 Introduction to Narrative Filmmaking

This course provides a foundation in the conceptual and technical building blocks of cinematic narrative. Students will investigate the nature of event, character, and place, developing their production and post-production skills in composition, camera movement, lighting, editing, and sound design to support and enhance storytelling.

Prereq: Admission to Moving-Image Production major, or permission of instructor.

  • WeFr 2:20PM – 4:25PM / Drake Center 2060 / Vera Brunner-Sung

 

THEATRE 5322 Art of Editing

Exploration of post-production techniques from editorial concepts to outputting video. Students will expand their knowledge of the editorial process and their analytical skills.

Prereq: 5321 and permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 633.

  • TuTh 12:40PM – 2:45PM / Drake Center 2060 / Janet Parrott

 

Film Studies Undergrad MJ/MN

PDF icon Film Studies Major Advising Sheet.pdf

PDF icon Film Studies Minor Advising Sheet.pdf

ACCAD 3350 - 10   The History of Animation
An overview of the history and theory of animation including origin of animation forms, Hollywood Studio animation, a sample of World Animation and contemporary animation. 
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for ArtsCol 350. Cred: 3 units
 
  • We Fr 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Wexner Center 001 / David Filipi

 

AFAMAST 4571 - 10 : Black Visual Culture and Popular Media

An examination of African Americans in visual culture and the theories of representation in popular media. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 571. GE VPA and diversity soc div in the US course.

  • Class 16384 / WeFr 11:10AM – 12:30PM / Mendenhall Lab 185 / Judson Jeffries
  • Class 17578 / WeFr 11:10AM – 12:30PM / Journalism Bldg 375 / Kenneth Goings

 

COMPSTD 3607 : Film and Literature as Narrative Art

Relationships between film and literature; emergence of cinematic art as a form of representation with emphasis on diverse cultural traditions. Prereq: English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 3607H (358H, 358). GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • Class 6651 / Mo 12:10PM – 2:00PM AND WeFr 12:40PM - 1:35PM / Mendenhall Lab 131 / Susan Hanson
  • Class 14952 / MoWe 12:45PM – 2:05PM AND Fr 12:45PM – 2:55 PM / McPherson Lab 2015 / Maurice Stevens 

 

ENGLISH 2263 : Introduction to Film

This course will explore the formal and technological means through which stories are told on film, and how those techniques interact with the film industry and the viewers on which it relies.  Among other things, we'll consider cinematography, editing, mise-en-scene, sound, genre, distribution, exhibition venues, and the star system.  Throughout, our emphasis will be on bringing out and building upon the skills as a viewer that you've already developed over two decades or more of watching.

Likely viewing will include Some Like It Hot, The Silence of the Lambs, The Palm Beach Story, Kick-Ass, Rope, Moonrise Kingdom, Singin' in the Rain, Dazed and Confused, Star Wars, Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, High Society, something quite recent and internationally successful, and a documentary (The Story of Film), along with a wide range of clips. Likely assignments will include weekly quizzes, an exhaustive description of a scene in one of our films, an essay, and a final exam.

LECTURE:

  • Tu Th 2:20PM 3:40PM / Hagerty Hall 180/ TBA

RECITATIONS:

  • Fr 1:50PM -2:45PM / Mendenhall Lab 131 / Staff
  • Fr 1:50PM -2:45PM / Scott lab N048/ Staff
  • Fr 3:00PM – 3:55PM / McPherson Lab 1046 / Staff
  • Fr 3:00PM – 3:55PM / Mendenhall Lab 131 / Staff
  • Fr 1:50PM -2:45PM / Jennings Hall 164 / Staff
  • Fr 12:40PM – 1:35PM / Mendenhall Lab 175 / Staff

 

ENGLISH 3378  : Special Topics in Film and Literature 

This course can satisfy various requirements: an upper-level (4000-level) or lower-level (3000-level) course for the English Major and Minor; a course for the Film Studies Minor; a course for the Popular Culture minor; a film course for the Pre-Education Major; and a Cultures and Ideas course for GE credit.

  • TuTh 11:10AM – 12:30PM / Gateway Film Center House 2 / Staff

 

ENGLISH 4578 - 0030 : Special Topics in Film

Examination of particular topics, themes, genres, or movements in cinema; topics may include particular directors (Orson Welles), periods (The Sixties), genres (horror). Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 cr hrs of English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. 5 qtr cr hrs in 367 or 3 cr hrs in 2367 in any subject is acceptable towards the 6 cr hrs. Not open to students with 15 qtr cr hrs for 578 or 9 sem cr hrs for 4578 or 4578H. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

  • MoWe 11:10PM - 12:30PM / Denney Hall 250 / David Brewer

Special Topic - Film of the 1990s  

This course will investigate the film (mostly American) produced in the decade in which most OSU undergraduates were born, though you may not have then watched anything beyond Toy Story.  In so doing, we will consider what we gain by approaching films in relation to their chronological peers, rather than organizing them by genre or director.  The '90s saw the advent of "indie" film, the expansion of ways of watching movies outside of theaters, and the increasing use of digital technology in filmmaking.  Likely assignments will include a viewing journal, a presentation, and a series of short writing exercises.  Possible viewings include Pulp Fiction, The Silence of the Lambs, The Big Lebowski, Trainspotting, L.A. Confidential, American Beauty, The Incredibly True Adventures of Two Girls in Love, Chasing Amy, Crooklyn, Delicatessen, Chunking Express, and Princess Mononoke.

 

FILMSTD 2271 : Introduction to Film Studies for Majors

An introduction to the field of Film Studies based on a survey of the major theories of film analysis, specifically geared for incoming majors. Prereq: English 2263 (263), or HistArt 2901 (260). Not open to students with credit for 2270 (270). GE VPA course.

  • TuTh 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Denney Hall 209 / Jesse Schotter

 

FILMSTD 4895   : Advanced Seminar: Topics in Film Studies

Selected problems (themes, movements, theories, genres, styles, etc.) in film studies; topics vary per semester. Preq: Enrollment in Film Studies major, and Sr standing, or permission of instructor.

  • We 12:55 – 3:40PM / Hagerty Hall 0062/ TBA

 

FRENCH 2801 - 10 : Classics of French Cinema

Introduction to the study of the cinema and to French film classics. Students will explore cinema as an art form, the social and cultural history of France as it relates to the cinema, and the qualities that make individual films cinematic masterpieces. Taught in English. GE VPA course.

  • TuTh 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Psychology Bldg 014 / Margaret Flinn

 

HISTART 2901 - 0001 : Introduction to World Cinema

Chronological survey of the most influential and recognized film artists and film movements of the world.  Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 260. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • Class 8311 / Tu Th 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Campbell Hall / Staff
  • Class 8312 / TuTh 5:30PM - 6:50PM / Hitchcock Hall 359 / Staff

 

HISTART 3901 - 0010 : World Cinema Today

An introduction to the art of international cinema today, including its forms and varied content. Prereq: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 350. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • Tu Th 3:55PM – 5:15PM /Scott Lab E001 / Staff

 

HISTART 5910 :  History of Documentary Cinema

A Historical, chronological survey of significant ideas about and contributions to documentary cinema. Prereq: Jr standing.

  • Class 18043 / TuTh 2:20PM – 3:40PM/ Hagerty Hall 046 / Erica Levin
  • Class 18042 / TuTh 2:20PM – 3:40PM/ Hagerty Hall 046 / Erica Levin

The artist Hito Steyerl observes, “The documentary form as such is now more potent than ever, even though we believe less than ever in documentary truth claims.” This course explores the paradox she identifies by looking closely at the history of documentary cinema, from the first film named to the genre – Nanook of the North – to the present day, as it shapes a wide range of moving image practices. The class follows an historical trajectory, but will encourage you to think comparatively and analytically about documentary form, ethics, and aesthetics. We will examine the major modes of documentary filmmaking including cinema verité, direct cinema, investigative documentary, ethnographic film, agit-prop, activist media, autobiography and the personal essay. Through formal analysis, we will ask how these different documentary modes generate or exploit a variety of “reality effects.” Along the way, we will consider why the promise of documentary truth is always beset by uncertainty, or as Steyerl describes it, “a shadow” of insecurity. Rather than accept this phenomenon as a constraint or a limit, we will explore how artists like Steyerl help us to see the value and meaning of the “perpetual doubt” documentary inspires.

 

ITALIAN 2053  Introduction to Italian Cinema

OSU Italian Film - @OSUItalianFilm - #osuitaliancinema 

Survey of the Italian cinema from the beginnings to today, with special emphasis on neorealism. Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 221. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

Italian 2053: Italian Cinema - Sex and Politics 

In Italian culture sex and politics are intimately entwined, as a daily look at Italian newspapers will reveal. Through examining the crossovers between ‘private’ arenas of home and family and ‘public’ realms of politics, the economy, and religion, this course aims to disclose how, in Italian culture, the personal and the political are inextricably linked. This course presents students with an overview of Italian cinema of the last seventy years and we will look in detail at films and serial television by several important Italian directors. We will touch upon major movements in Italian screen history, including Neorealism, commedia all’italiana, engaged or political cinema, the spaghetti western, mafia movies, the film noir, and quality television. Topics and historical periods to be addressed include: Italian fascism (including Italy’s problematic alliance with Nazi Germany and the Partisan Resistance,) the so-called ‘economic miracle,’ regionalism, Italy’s not-so ‘Dolce vita,’ gender relations, the mafias, political corruption, and terrorism. Taught in English. GE Visual Performing Arts and Diversity Global Studies.

Film List:
Gomorra: la serie (Gomorrah, Stefano Sollima 2014- ) Tv Series
Roma, città aperta (Rome, Open City, Roberto Rossellini, 1945, 100m)
Ladri di biciclette (Bicycle Thieves, Vittorio De Sica, 1948, 93m)
Il conformista (The Conformist, Bernardo Bertolucci, 1971, 111m)
Un film d’amore e d’anarchia (Love and Anarchy, Lina Wertmuller, 1973, 120m)
Per un pugno di dollari (A Fistful of Dollars, Sergio Leone, 1964, 99m)
Portiere di notte (The Night Porter, Liliana Cavani, 1974, 120m)
Sedotta e abbandonata (Seduced and Abandoned, Pietro Germi, 1964, 115m)
Buongiorno, notte (Good Morning, Night, Marco Bellocchio, 2003, 106m)
I cento passi (The Hundred Steps, Marco Tullio Giordana, 2000, 114m)
La grande bellezza (The Great Beauty, Paolo Sorrentino, 2013, 100m)

  • MoWe 12:40PM – 1:35PM / Hitchcock 131/ Dana Renga
  •  Fr 12:40PM – 1:35PM / Journalism 353/ Staff
  • Th 12:40PM – 1:35PM / TBA/ Staff
  • Th12:40PM – 1:35PM /TBA/ Staff
  • Fr 12:40PM – 1:35PM / Scott Lab N056/ Staff

 

RUSSIAN 3460: Modern Russian Experience through Film

Exploration of some of the most revealing hopes and disappointments of Russian people presented in internationally acclaimed Russian films. Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 360. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • Tu Th 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Lazenby Hall 0134 / Helena Goscilo
  • Tu Th 9:35PM – 10:55PM / Hagerty Hall 251 / Staff
  • WeFr 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Campbell Hall 309 / Staff

 

SLAVIC 3310: Science Fiction: East vs. West

Slavic, American, and British sci-fi on page and screen as reflection of major cultural concerns: progress, utopia, human perfectibility, limits of science and knowledge, gender, identity. Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 3320 or WGSSt 3310. GE VPA and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in WGSSt.

  • Tu Th 12:45PM – 2:05PM / Denney Hall 238/Helena Goscilo

 

SLAVIC 3360:  Screening Minorities: Representations of the Other in Slavic Film

Film representations of ethnic and religious others in East European cinema.  Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 360. GE VPA course.

  • We Fr 11:10AM – 12:30PM / Hagerty Hall 046 / Staff

 

SPANISH 4581:  Spanish Film

Study of Spanish film; special attention is paid to the relationship between film and the society in which it is produced. Prereq: A grade of C- or above in 3450 (450) or 3450H (450H). Not open to students with credit for 581. FL Admis Cond course.

  • Tu Th 11:10AM – 12:30PM / Hagerty Hall 046 / Elizabeth Davis

 

WGSST 3317 - 0010   Hollywood, Women, and Film

A critical survey of the rep. of women in Hollywood cinema, examples drawn from the 1930's to present. Learn how film has functioned in its representation of women and how and why women film makers have created alternative visions of women in film. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 317. GE VPA course.

  • WeFr 9:35AM – 10:55AM / University Hall 056 / Tjalling Valdes Olmos
  • TuTh 11:10AM - 12:30PM / University Hall 056 / Maghan Jackson

WGSST 4527:  Studies in Gender and Cinema

Analysis of different film types focused on women to help students understand historical scope, theoretical frameworks, and reading strategies for understanding these films; topics vary. Prereq: Not open to students with 10 qtr cr hrs of 527 or FilmStd 527.

This course is a survey of funny women in American cinema from the silent era through Melissa McCarthy and Kristen Wiig.  We will focus on the cinematic genres and cultural conventions that enabled women to be slapstick and campy comic stars through the 1930s, and we will examine the shift to romantic comedy that popularized a far more conservative comic story and heroine.  We will also study the comedians, comic teams, and ensembles that are the predecessors of today’s female comic stars, directors, and screenwriters.  A major emphasis of this course is the intersection of race, class, gender and sexuality in the themes and personas of women’s comedy.

  • TuTh 9:35AM – 10:55AM/University Hall 056 / Linda Mizejewski

 

Screenwriting

PDF icon Screenwriting Minor Advising Sheet.pdf

 

FILMSTD 4800 Story Development for Film and Television

In this course, students will harness their pre-existing critical thinking skills and historical knowledge to develop a personal statement-of-purpose that enables them to generate and refine their own original film and television concepts for subsequent production projects.

Prereq: Permission of instructor. Not available for students with credit for FilmStd 4194 AU 14 or English 4800.

  • Mo 3:30PM – 6:15PM / Denney Hall 213 / Angus Fletcher

 

FILMSTD 4880 - 10   Screenwriting and the Business of Cinema

This course examines screenwriting as both a literary art form and a challenging profession. Prereq: Theatre 5331 (636), or permission of instructor. Not open to credit to students with credit for 680.

  • We Fr 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Denney Hall 202 / Andrew Rose

 

FILMSTD 4881 - 10   Screenwriting and the Business of Television

This course examines television writing from both a creative and business perspective. Each student will individually pitch, and then write the show's bible, outline, and pilot. Students learn about teleplay structure, as well as ways to develop intriguing characters, realistic dialogue, and engaging episodes. In small groups students develop, write, and read others' work collectively. Prereq: Theatre 5331 or permission of instructor. Not available to students with credit for 5194 Sp15.

  • We Fr 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Denney Hall 202 / Andrew Rose

 

THEATRE 5331: Screenwriting

Exploration of creative script-writing for video/cinema; development of short or feature length scripts. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 636.

  • We Fr 11:10AM – 12:30PM / Drake Center 2038 / Scott Spears (combined section class)
  • We Fr 12:35PM – 2:05PM / Drake Center 2038 / Scott Spears (combined section class)

 

Focus Area and Production Electives

 

ART 2500: Visual Studies: Digital Image Manipulation

Introduction to the creation, manipulation and critical interpretation of graphic and photographic artwork. Includes input and output of digital work as it applies to artists. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 350.

  • Mo We Fr 10:05AM - 11:55AM / Hopkins Hall 356 / Staff
  • Mo We Fr 12:05PM - 1:55PM / Hopkins Hall 356 / Staff
  • TuTh 11:10AM - 1:55PM / Hopkins Hall 356 / Amy Youngs
  • TuTh 3:55PM - 6:40PM / Hopkins Hall 356 / Staff
  • MoWe 3:55PM - 6:40PM / Hopkins Hall 356 / Staff

 

ART 3009 - 0010 : Film/Video I: Technologies and Analysis

Introduction to the creation and analysis of video artwork; including techniques of video capture, post production, manipulation and critique within the context of art. Not open to students with credit for 5501.

  • MoWe 6:55PM – 9:40PM / University Hall 024 / Staff

 

ART 4101: Moving Image Art

Creation, manipulation and animation of digital imagery, including the integration of multiple media elements, such as video, drawings and audio into artistic projects.  Prereq: 2500 or 350, and 3101 (452) or 4001 or 553. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

  • MoWe 3:55PM – 6:40PM / Hopkins Hall 156 / Staff

 

ART 4201:  New Media Art

Approaches to new media, interactivity, digital control of objects, projections, and sound in installation events, performances, and exhibitions. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

  • TuTh 11:10AM – 1:55PM / Hopkins Hall 156 / Staff

 

ART 4401: Computer Animation

Focus on the concepts, aesthetics, processes, and practice of designing and producing 3D computer animation. Theory and techniques of cinematography, video production and sound as related to 3D computer animation will be covered.

Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

  • TuTh 11:10AM – 1:55PM / Hopkins Hall 180A / Staff

 

DANCE 5211: Dance - Film I

Dance-film is the marriage of dance and film language, not just recording dancing, but a cinematic reimagining of dance's possibilities. Work that can only exist on the screen. Taught like a film class, this is a laboratory for investigating this reimagining.

Class participants will explore film grammar and experimental narrative through hands-on creative work, classroom viewings and discussion. Participants will learn photographic principles, Final Cut Pro editing, production techniques and will create three dance-films.
 

Non-Dept of Dance students are welcome, contact Professor Rose for more information.  Prereq: Jr standing, and enrollment in Dance major; or grad standing; or permission of instructor.

  • MoWe 5:10PM - 7:10PM / Sullivant Hall 343 / Mitchell Rose

 

DANCE 5212 : Dance - Film II

Continuing studies from Dance Film I in dance on camera, exploring aspects of history, composition and technology as a foundation for video production.

Prereq: 5211, or permission of instructor.

  • TuTh 3:00PM- 5:00PM / Sullivant Hall 343 / Mitchell Rose

 

THEATRE: 2341H Moving Image Art

The issues and concepts fundamental to the development of an understanding of the aesthetics of film and video from the standpoint of the producer and maker.  Prereq: Honors standing or by permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 230H. GE VPA course.

  • WeFr 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Drake Center 2060 / Staff

 

THEATRE 5321: Film/Video Production I

Basics of film/video production through lectures, analysis, and projects. Camera, sound, lighting, and editing techniques are practiced in collaborative and individual settings. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 634.

  • TuTh 3:55PM - 5:15PM / Drake Center 2060 / David Fisher

 

Graduate Courses

 

ENGLISH 6778.01 Introduction to Graduate Study in Film and Film Theory

An advanced survey of the methodologies, contexts, and development of film and film theory.

Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 6778.01 (778) or 6778.02.

  • Fr 9:10AM – 12:10AM / Denney Hall 435 / Jared Gardner

 

FILMSTD 7000 - 10   Graduate Studies in Film History

Study of the social, industrial, technological, and intellectual history of cinema, including cinema's relationships to modernity and its transnational developments. 
Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor.

  • Th 3:00PM – 5:55PM / Derby Hall 038 / Ryan Friedman

Course Topic – 

 
 

 

 German 6400  Introduction to German Film

 
 
  • TuTh 3:55PM – 5:15PM / Dulles Hall 027 / John Davidson

Course Topic:

Taught in English, this Introduction to German Film is designed to familiarize graduate students to central texts, historical periods, and formal analysis relevant to the study of German cinema. This course will be divided into units that each address a particular (sub-)period and theme. The class will meet twice per week in 80-minute class sessions covering:

•           Introductory lecture, discussion of historical period, and one or more formal cinematic element;

•           Film discussion and analytical application [viewing assignments completed outside of class]

The aim of the course is to equip students with the tools needed to engage with film and visual material critically as they encounter it in further coursework and/or stages of scholarly development, be that further work in cinematic research or in preparation for Area 3 of Germanic L&L’s Master’s Assessment. Those who successfully complete this course should be able to integrate German film into their teaching profile as generalists in Germanistik or in a European cinema-studies context. This class counts in the Film Studies graduate program.

 

SLAVIC 6000: Slavic Literature, Film, and Cultural Studies Professionalization Forum

Biweekly colloquium for presentations and discussion of research by graduate students, faculty, and visiting scholars. Required for M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Slavic Literatures and Cultures.

Prereq: Grad standing. Repeatable to a maximum of 8 cr hrs. This course is graded S/U

  • Fr 5:15PM - 6:45PM / Hagerty Hall 406 / Staff

Course Topic – To be announced.

SLAVIC 7480: Slavic Film Directors

Slavic and East European film directors as auteurs; key notions of contemporary film theory. Taught in English.

Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs with change of topic.

  • M 2:15PM – 5:00PM / Hagerty Hall 351 / Helena Goscilo

Course Topic – To be announced.

SPANISH 7800: Latin American Film

Study of Latin American film focusing on historical periods, dominant genres, distinguished directors, and relation of film to larger social, cultural and political dynamics.

Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 780.

  • Fr 11:30AM – 2:15PM / Hagerty Hall 045 / Laura Podasky

**Course is taught in Spanish. Students with sufficient abilities to comprehend Spanish (in oral and written formats) can participate in class discussions and write their papers in English so are encouraged to enroll. 

 

 

 

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