Spring 2018

Please check Buckeyelink and/or refer to a course's home department for any questions about course topics, instructors, or schedules. You can find instructor contact information on the department's homepage or using the people find search engine on my.osu.edu.

Moving-Image Production courses / Film Studies Undergraduate Major and Minor courses / Screenwriting Focus courses / Production Focus courses / Graduate Courses 

Moving-Image Production Major

PDF icon MIP Advising Sheet.pdf

 

MVNGIMG 2202 - 0010 :  Filmmaking Foundation II

This course is second in a sequence to introduce moving image production as an artistic, cultural, and multi-modal practice. It focuses on the building blocks of film grammar and offers an introduction to fundamental concepts and tools needed to work in the moving image, grounded in critical and historical context. Students use project-based learning to work independently and collaboratively. Prereq: 2201.

Lecture:

  • Mo 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Gateway Film Center House 4 / Vera Brunner-Sung

Available Labs:

  • We 4:10PM - 6:15PM / Hagerty Hall 050 / Staff
  • We 6:30PM - 8:35PM / Hagerty Hall 050 / Staff

 

Film Studies Undergrad MJ/MN

PDF icon Film Studies Major Advising Sheet.pdf

PDF icon Film Studies Minor Advising Sheet.pdf

 

AFAMAST 4571 - 10 : Black Visual Culture and Popular Media

An examination of African Americans in visual culture and the theories of representation in popular media. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 571. GE VPA and diversity soc div in the US course.

  • Mo We 3:55PM - 5:15PM / Enarson Classroom Bldg 015 / Mollie-Marie Workman

 

CHINESE 4405 - 0100 : China in Chinese Film

An overview of Chinese cinema, with a focus on how film represents issues of nationhood, national identity, and national trauma. Taught in English, no Chinese required. Prereq: English 1110 or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 505. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • Mo 2:15PM - 5:00PM / Derby Hall 080 / Kirk Denton
  • We 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Ramseyer Hall 110 / Kirk Denton

 

COMPSTD 3607 - 0010 : Film and Literature as Narrative Art

Relationships between film and literature; emergence of cinematic art as a form of representation with emphasis on diverse cultural traditions. Prereq: English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 3607H (358H, 358). GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • Mo We 11:30AM - 12:25PM AND Fr 11:30AM - 1:35PM / Biological Sciences Bldg 668 / Kevin Pementel
  • Tu 11:10AM - 12:30PM AND  Th 11:10AM - 1:15PM / TBA / Maurice Stevens

 

ENGLISH 2263 - 0010 : Introduction to Film

This course will explore the formal and technological means through which stories are told on film, and how those techniques interact with the film industry and the viewers on which it relies.  Among other things, we'll consider cinematography, editing, mise-en-scene, sound, genre, distribution, exhibition venues, and the star system.  Throughout, our emphasis will be on bringing out and building upon the skills as a viewer that you've already developed over two decades or more of watching.

Likely viewing will include Some Like It Hot, The Silence of the Lambs, The Palm Beach Story, Kick-Ass, Rope, Moonrise Kingdom, Singin' in the Rain, Dazed and Confused, Star Wars, Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, High Society, something quite recent and internationally successful, and a documentary (The Story of Film), along with a wide range of clips. Likely assignments will include weekly quizzes, an exhaustive description of a scene in one of our films, an essay, and a final exam.

LECTURE:

  • Tu Th 2:20PM Fr 12:40PM - 1:35PM

RECITATIONS:

  • Fr 12:40PM - 1:35PM / Mendenhall Lab 129 / Staff
  • Fr 12:40PM - 1:35PM / Mendenhall Lab 173 / Staff
  • Fr 1:50PM - 2:45PM / Mendenhall Lab 175 / Staff
  • Fr 1:50PM - 2:45PM / Mendenhall Lab 129 / Staff

 

ENGLISH 3378 - 0010 : Special Topics in Film and Literature : Shakespeare and Film

In this course, we will study some of the most innovative and influential films ever made of Shakespeare's plays.  We will both read specific plays (probably RICHARD III, A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM, MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, ROMEO AND JULIET, HAMLET, TITUS ANDRONICUS, and MACBETH) and view films that cut across dramatic genres, time periods, countries, and cinematic styles, by such directors as Max Reinhardt (Austria and Germany), Laurence Olivier (England), Akira Kurosawa (Japan), Baz Luhrmann (Australia), Michael Almereyda (U.S.), Al Pacino (U.S.), and Julie Taymor (U.S.). We will focus on how directors and actors have chosen to adapt Shakespeare for performance, but also consider how these films have shaped, and continue to shape, the cultural meaning of "Shakespeare" for modern audiences.  Requirements will include two essays, several quizzes, a midterm, a final exam, regular attendance, and active participation.

This course can satisfy various requirements: an upper-level (4000-level) or lower-level (3000-level) course for the English Major and Minor; a course for the Film Studies Minor; a course for the Popular Culture minor; a film course for the Pre-Education Major; and a Cultures and Ideas course for GE credit.

  • We Fr 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Page Hall 060 / Alan Farmer

 

ENGLISH 4578 - 0020 : Special Topics in Film : Film and Video Games

In the last decade, the video game industry has eclipsed the movies in popularity.  This class will examine how films from Hollywood and around the world have reacted to the rise of video games as a new and increasingly dominant medium.  We'll spend the first few weeks articulating the similarities and differences between video games and cinema, and looking at the ways in which video games have become more like films.  In so doing, we'll explore theories of video games and of the relationship between competing media forms.  The bulk of the class will focus on an examination of recent films that seek to emulate or improve upon the unique characteristics of video games.   We'll examine issues of narrative, spectatorship, performance, and gender representation.  Films may include The Matrix, Children of Men, Scott Pilgrim vs. The World, Run Lola Run, Holy Motors, and Being John Malkovich.  Assignments will include two papers, as well as two brief responses and presentations about individual video games.

  • We Fr 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Denney Hall 206 / Jesse Schotter

 

ENGLISH 4578 - 0030 : Special Topics in Film

Examination of particular topics, themes, genres, or movements in cinema; topics may include particular directors (Orson Welles), periods (The Sixties), genres (horror). Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 cr hrs of English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. 5 qtr cr hrs in 367 or 3 cr hrs in 2367 in any subject is acceptable towards the 6 cr hrs. Not open to students with 15 qtr cr hrs for 578 or 9 sem cr hrs for 4578 or 4578H. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

  • TuTh 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Denney Hall 238 / Jian Chen

 

FILMSTD 2271 - 10 : Introduction to Film Studies for Majors

An introduction to the field of Film Studies based on a survey of the major theories of film analysis, specifically geared for incoming majors. Prereq: English 2263 (263), or HistArt 2901 (260). Not open to students with credit for 2270 (270). GE VPA course.

  • We Fr 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Hagerty Hall 062 / Jesse Schotter

 

FILMSTD 4640 - 10 : Studies in Cinema History

An upper-level course on aspects of film history geared toward film studies majors.  Prereq: 2270 or 2271, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

Course topic - American Film After 1970

  • Tu Th 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Hagerty Hall 062 / Jane Greene

 

FILMSTD 4895 - 10 : Advanced Seminar: Topics in Film Studies

Special Topic: Hollywood's World War II. This course examines the profound changes in Hollywood cinema that occurred between 1941-1945, as the studios geared their production toward supporting the United States? war efforts. Viewing and discussing films that represent specific facets of this cooperation, we will consider how the studios: embraced an interventionist stance, retooled existing film genres (like the musical and the melodrama) to make them platforms for broadcasting official messages about the nation and its people, became involved directly in informational and propaganda filmmaking, exploited changes in censorship practices to create a popular new film genre (film noir), represented combat in fictional films, and looked forward to the return of veterans to civilian life.   Non-Film Studies Majors who are interested in this course should email filmstudies@osu.edu to ask about permission for enrollment.

  • Tu Th 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Hagerty Hall 050 / Ryan Friedman

 

FRENCH 2801 - 10 : Classics of French Cinema

Introduction to the study of the cinema and to French film classics. Students will explore cinema as an art form, the social and cultural history of France as it relates to the cinema, and the qualities that make individual films cinematic masterpieces. Taught in English. GE VPA course.

  • Tu Th 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Gateway Film Center House 4 / Margaret Flinn

 

GERMAN 3351 - 010 : Democracy, Fascism and German Culture

Explore the history of the Weimar Republic and of Nazi Germany through the literature, film, music, visual arts and design produced between 1918 and 1945. We will be uncovering the roots of fascism and looking also at its echoes in works created in post-Nazi Germany. What can the cultural products tell us that the history books can?t? Were the 1920s really the golden age of German cinema? How did the arts change after the Nazis came to power in 1933? Why did the Nazis burn books and call certain artistic styles degenerate? Taught in English. Meets Film Studies' Pre-1950s requirement. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course.

  • Tu Th 2:20PM - 3:40PM / McPherson Lab 2015 / John Davidson

 

HISTART 2901 - 0001 : Introduction to World Cinema

Chronological survey of the most influential and recognized film artists and film movements of the world.  Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 260. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • Tu Th 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Knowlton Hall 250 / Staff
  • Mo We 5:30PM - 6:50PM / McPherson Lab 1015 / Staff
  • Distance Enhanced / TBA / TBA / Kristina Paulsen

 

HISTART 3901 - 0010 : World Cinema Today

An introduction to the art of international cinema today, including its forms and varied content. Prereq: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 350. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • Tu Th 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Hagerty Hall 180 / Erica Levin

 

HISTART 5905 - 0010   Avant-Garde Cinema

A survey of significant historical contributions to avant-garde cinema. Prereq: Jr standing. Not open to students with credit for 650.

  • We Fr 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Hagerty Hall 046 / Erica Levin
  • We Fr 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Hagerty Hall 046 / Erica Levin

 

ITALIAN 2055 - 10   Mafia Movies

Examines Italian and American mafia movies made from 1905 to the present day and traces the history of the Italian and Italian American Mafias.  Taught in English. GE VPA course.

  • We Fr 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Gateway Film Center House 1 / Dana Renga

 

ITALIAN 4223 - 10   Italian Cinema

Examination of Italian cinema from Neorealism to the present. Discussion of contemporary society and culture with a brief introduction to film theory. Not open students who are native speakers of Italian. Prereq: One course at the 3000 (400) level or above, or permission of the instructor. Not open to students with credit for 613. FL Admis Cond course.

  • TuTh 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Hagerty Hall 251 / Jonathan Mullins

               

JAPANSE 4400 - 0100   Japanese Film and Visual Media

An overview of Japanese cinema and visual media, with a focus on genre: canonical and popular works of anime, yakuza film, historical/samurai film, comedies, and documentaries. Taught in English, no Japanese required.

  • TuTh 3:55PM - 5:15PM / Journalism Bldg 239 / Richard Torrance

 

MUSIC 3344 - 020 : Film Music

A study of how music has functioned in film across its century-long history, as produced in Hollywood and in other countries, and by filmmakers independent of the studio system. Prereq: English 1110 or 1111. GE VPA course.

  • Tu Th 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Weigel Hall 177 / Elizabeth Kirkendoll

 

RUSSIAN 3460 - 0010 : Modern Russian Experience through Film

Exploration of some of the most revealing hopes and disappointments of Russian people presented in internationally acclaimed Russian films. Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 360. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • Tu Th 11:10AM - 12:30PM / McPherson Lab 2019 / Helena Goscilo
  • Tu Th 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Enarson Classroom Bldg 202 / Staff

 

SLAVIC 3360 - 0010   Screening Minorities: Representations of the Other in Slavic Film

Film representations of ethnic and religious others in East European cinema.  Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 360. GE VPA course.

  • We Fr 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Campbell Hall 243 / Staff

 

SLAVIC 3310 - 0010   Science Fiction: East vs. West

Slavic, American, and British sci-fi on page and screen as reflection of major cultural concerns: progress, utopia, human perfectibility, limits of science and knowledge, gender, identity. Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 3320 or WGSSt 3310. GE VPA and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in WGSSt.

  • Tu Th 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Hagerty Hall 042 / Helena Goscilo

 

SPANISH 4581 - 1   Spanish Film

Study of Spanish film; special attention is paid to the relationship between film and the society in which it is produced. Prereq: A grade of C- or above in 3450 (450) or 3450H (450H). Not open to students with credit for 581. FL Admis Cond course.

  • Tu Th 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Hagerty Hall 050 / Elizabeth Davis

 

WGSST 3317 - 0010   Hollywood, Women, and Film

A critical survey of the rep. of women in Hollywood cinema, examples drawn from the 1930's to present. Learn how film has functioned in its representation of women and how and why women film makers have created alternative visions of women in film. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 317. GE VPA course.

  • We Fr 3:55PM - 5:15PM / University Hall 038 / Joy Ellison
  • Tu Th 11:10AM - 12:30PM / University Hall 082 / Sonnet Gabbard

WGSST 3310 - 0010   Science Fiction: East vs. West

Slavic, American, and British sci-fi on page and screen as reflection of major cultural concerns: progress, utopia, human perfectibility, limits of science and knowledge, gender, identity. Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for Slavic 3310 or 3320. GE VPA and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in Slavic.

  • Tu Th 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Hagerty Hall 042 / Helena Goscilo

 

Screenwriting

PDF icon Screenwriting Minor Advising Sheet.pdf

 

THEATRE 5331 - 0010 : Screenwriting

Exploration of creative script-writing for video/cinema; development of short or feature length scripts. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 636.

  • We Fr 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Drake Center 2038 / Scott Spears (combined section class)
  • We Fr 3:55PM - 5:15PM / Drake Center 2038 / Scott Spears (combined section class)

 

FILMSTD 4880 - 10   Screenwriting and the Business of Cinema

This course examines screenwriting as both a literary art form and a challenging profession. Prereq: Theatre 5331 (636), or permission of instructor. Not open to credit to students with credit for 680.

  • We Fr 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Denney Hall 262 / Andrew Rose

 

FILMSTD 4881 - 10   Screenwriting and the Business of Television

This course examines television writing from both a creative and business perspective. Each student will individually pitch, and then write the show's bible, outline, and pilot. Students learn about teleplay structure, as well as ways to develop intriguing characters, realistic dialogue, and engaging episodes. In small groups students develop, write, and read others' work collectively. Prereq: Theatre 5331 or permission of instructor. Not available to students with credit for 5194 Sp15.

  • We Fr 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Denney Hall 262 / Andrew Rose

 

FILMSTD 4890 - 20   Advanced Screenwriting

An intensive writing course in which each student completes a feature-length screenplay based on work previously completed in Film Studies 680 or Film Studies 4880. Prereq:4880 (680), and permission of director. Not open to students with credit for 690.

  • Mo 12:40PM - 3:25PM / Hagerty Hall 045 / Angus Fletcher

 

Production

 

ACCAD 5141 - 10 : Interactive Arts Media: UI/UX

Practice in methods for designing and crafting user experiences (UX) and user interfaces (UI) for web applications.

  • Mo We 5:30PM - 6:50PM / Sullivant Hall 349A / Jeremy Patterson

 

ACCAD 5002 - 10 : 3D Computer Animation: Form, Light and Motion I

Overview of 3D computer animation components and stages of production. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for ArtsCol 749.

  • Tu Th 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Sullivant Hall 349A / Stephen Conroy

 

ACCAD 5003 - 10 : 3D Computer Animation: Form, Light and Motion II

Further exploration of 3D computer animation and stages of production. Prereq: 5002, or permission of instructor.

  • Tu Th 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Sullivant Hall 349A / Alan Price

 

ART 2500 - 0020   Visual Studies: Digital Image Manipulation

Introduction to the creation, manipulation and critical interpretation of graphic and photographic artwork. Includes input and output of digital work as it applies to artists. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 350.

  • Mo We Fr 10:05AM - 11:55AM / Hopkins Hall 356 / Staff
  • Mo We Fr 12:05PM - 1:55PM / Hopkins Hall 356 / Staff
  • Mo We 11:10AM - 1:55PM / Hopkins Hall 156 / Amy Youngs
  • Tu Th 3:55PM - 6:40PM / Hopkins Hall 156 / Staff

 

ART 4101 - 0010   Moving Image Art

Creation, manipulation and animation of digital imagery, including the integration of multiple media elements, such as video, drawings and audio into artistic projects.  Prereq: 2500 or 350, and 3101 (452) or 4001 or 553. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

  • Tu Th 11:10AM - 1:55PM / Hopkins Hall 156 / Staff

 

ART 4201 - 0010   New Media Art

Approaches to new media, interactivity, digital control of objects, projections, and sound in installation events, performances, and exhibitions. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

  • Tu Th 8:10AM - 10:55AM / Hopkins Hall 156 / Staff

 

ART 2555 - 0030   Photography I - Digital Camera

Introduces photographic theory, practice, and aesthetics with image production, commercial lab prints and critiques. Student provides digital camera, minimum 6 mp, with full manual controls and exposure compensation available. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 300.01, 300.02, or 300.02H. GE VPA course. VSP Admis Cond course.

  • Tu Th 8:10AM - 10:55AM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff
  • Mo We Fr 10:05AM - 11:55AM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff
  • Tu Th 11:10AM - 1:55PM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff
  • Mo We Fr 12:05PM - 1:55PM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff
  • Tu Th 3:55PM - 6:40PM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff
  • Mo We Fr 2:05PM - 3:55PM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff
  • Tu Th 6:55PM - 9:40PM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff
  • Mo We Fr 4:05PM - 5:55PM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff
  • Mo We 6:05PM - 8:45PM / Hopkins Hall 262 / Staff

 

ART 3009 - 0010 : Film/Video I: Technologies and Analysis

Introduction to the creation and analysis of video artwork; including techniques of video capture, post production, manipulation and critique within the context of art. Not open to students with credit for 5501.

  • Tu Th 3:55PM - 6:40PM / Hopkins Hall 356 / Staff

 

ART 4009 - 0010 : Film/Video II: Experimental Strategies

This course is designed as an overview of a broad range of strategies and issues unique to the practice sometimes labeled "experimental film," avant-garde cinema," or "video art." Intermediate theory and practice of creating film/video artwork.  Emphasis on personal expression and experimental approaches. Prereq: 3009, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 5551.

  • Mo We 6:55PM - 9:40PM / Hopkins Hall 250 / Staff

 

DANCE 5211 - 0010 : Dance - Film I

An introduction to creating short films of dance made specifically for the camera. Basics of camera and Final Cut Pro are taught as three film projects are created.  Prereq: Jr standing, and enrollment in Dance major; or grad standing; or permission of instructor.

  • Tu Th 5:10PM - 7:10PM / Sullivant Hall 343 / Mitchell Rose

 

THEATRE 2341H - 0010 :  Moving Image Art

The issues and concepts fundamental to the development of an understanding of the aesthetics of film and video from the standpoint of the producer and maker.  Prereq: Honors standing or by permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 230H. GE VPA course.

  • We Fr 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Drake Center 2060 / Vera Brunner-Sung

 

THEATRE 5321 - 0010  : Film/Video Production I

Basics of film/video production through lectures, analysis, and projects. Camera, sound, lighting, and editing techniques are practiced in collaborative and individual settings. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 634.

  • Tu Th 3:55PM - 5:15PM / Drake Center 2060 / David Fisher

 

THEATRE 5323 - 0010   Film/Video Production II

Intermediate film/video analysis and production through research and project assignments with camera, sound, lighting, and editing techniques. Prereq: 5321, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

  • We Fr 9:30AM - 11:30AM / Drake Center 2060 / Janet Parrott

 

Graduate Courses

 

ENGLISH 7878.01 - 0010   Seminar in Film & Media Studies

An intensive study of selected issues, themes, and forms in Film & Media Studies. Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with 10 qtr cr hrs for 878 or 6 sem cr hrs for 7878.01 or 7878.02. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

  • Th 1:50PM - 4:50PM / Denney Hall 435 / Jian Chen

 

ENGLISH 7878.02 - 0020   Seminar in Film & Media Studies

An intensive study of selected issues, themes, and forms in Film & Media Studies. Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with 10 qtr cr hrs for 878 or 6 sem cr hrs for 7878.01 or 7878.02. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs. This course is graded S/U.

  • Th 1:50PM - 4:50PM / Denney Hall 435 / Jian Chen

 

FILMSTD 7001 - 10   Advanced Theory Seminar: Methods and Applications

A theory and methods seminar which focuses on one scholarly approach to cinema (auteurism, formalism, historicism, feminism, etc). Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

  • We 1:00PM - 4:00PM / Denney Hall 435 / Sean O'Sullivan

Course Topic - "Authorship and Its Discontents"

The question of authorship has been both the lifeblood and the bane of film studies since its birth as a discipline.  The primacy of the cult of the director has been variously challenged by shifting authorial power to other agents--the studio, the performer, and (in television) the writer--or by casting doubt on the validity of a literary model of creative ownership, within a profoundly collaborative medium.  This seminar will engage the debates over authorship in cinema and TV, considering battles about design, category, and contribution across a range of eras, genres, and contexts.  Our recurrent concerns will be: when do we care about authorship, and why does it matter?  Primary materials may include: Casablanca, Cameraperson, Exit Through the Gift Shop, The Beaches of Agnes, Twelve Years a Slave, 2046, Close-Up, Family Plot, Intolerance, Wonder Woman, I Love Lucy, and Louie.

HISTART 5905 - 0010   Avant-Garde Cinema

A survey of significant historical contributions to avant-garde cinema.  Prereq: Jr standing. Not open to students with credit for 650.

  • We Fr 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Hagerty Hall 046 / Erica Levin

 

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