Spring 2021 Course Offerings

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The most up-to-date meeting times for the courses can be found via the Schedule of Classes on BuckeyeLink.

If you have questions about major or minor requirements please contact an advisor to assist you.

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Screenwriting Minor

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Film Studies 4880

This course examines screenwriting as both a literary art form and a challenging profession.  Each student will take an original premise for a movie and develop it into a logline, a treatment, a step outline, and ultimately, a polished first act of a feature-length screenplay. During this process, students will learn about three-act dramatic structure and proper script formatting, as well as ways to create intriguing characters and realistic dialogue. In addition, students will be taught the essentials necessary to succeed in the highly competitive world of professional screenwriting, including how to break into the business, attain representative, the types of deals available to a screenwriter, and more. Prereq: Theater 5331 or permission of instructor. 

Film Studies 4881

This course examines television writing from both a creative and business perspective. Each student will individually pitch an idea for an original half-hour TV series to the class, and then write the show’s bible, outline, and pilot. In addition, students will work in small groups to collectively develop and write the bible and pilot of an hour-long TV series. Finally, students will learn how shows are created at the various networks, the different seasons of development, a writer’s role on a TV series, and the types of deals available to writers in the TV business. Prereq: Theater 5331 or permission of instructor.

Film Studies 4890

An intensive writing course in which each student completes a feature-length screenplay based on work previously completed in Film Studies 680 or Film Studies 4880.

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Film Studies Major/Minor

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English 2263: Introduction to Film

Introduction to methods of reading film texts by analyzing cinema as technique, as system, and as cultural product.

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History of Art 2901: Intro to World Cinema

Chronological survey of the most influential and recognized film artists and film movements of the world.

Film Studies 2271 

An introduction to the field of Film Studies based on a survey of the major theories of film analysis, specifically geared for incoming majors.

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Non-Industrial

History of Art 5001: Film Theory - Section taught by Erica Levin only

Topics to be announced.

Non-Fictional

No Courses.

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Chinese 4405: China in Chinese Film

An overview of Chinese cinema, with a focus on how film represents issues of nationhood, national identity, and national trauma. Taught in English, no Chinese required.

History of Art 3901: World Cinema Today

An introduction to the art of international cinema today, including its forms and varied content. 
GE Visual and Performing Arts, GE Diversity: Global Studies.

Russian 3460.01: Modern Russian Experience through Film

Exploration of some of the most revealing hopes and disappointments of Russian people presented in internationally acclaimed Russian films. Taught in English. GE Visual and Performing Arts, GE Diversity: Global Studies.

Russian 3460.99: Modern Russian Experience through Film Asynchronous Distance

Exploration of some of the most revealing hopes and disappointments of Russian people presented in internationally acclaimed Russian films. Taught in English. 100% online. GE Visual and Performing Arts, GE Diversity: Global Studies.

Slavic 3360

Film representations of ethnic and religious others in East European cinema.  Taught in English.

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English 4578: Film and American Society after WWII

This course examines the history of the American cinema in the years immediately following the Second World War, covering the period from 1945 to 1960. We will view and discuss significant Hollywood films from a variety of genres (e.g., comedy, musical, film noir, western, melodrama, social problem film), contextualizing them by reading articles and excerpts published in a variety of venues (e.g., popular magazines, film-trade publications, books of sociology and psychology) during the era in which these films were produced and exhibited. These textual primary sources will serve to illustrate historical discourses describing, reinforcing, and/or critiquing what were conceived of as significant social issues and shifts—from the “veterans problem,” to the “housing crisis,” to “juvenile delinquency,” to sexism, and residential segregation. In our discussions, we’ll be interested in how the assigned films reflected, responded to, and inflected the print debates happening around these issues and shifts—even and perhaps especially when the films are not overtly working in the “social problem” genre. We’ll also approach the films in the context of the upheavals happening in the American film industry during this period, as a result of the Paramount decree, the HUAC hearings, suburbanization, and declining movie theater attendance. In particular, we’ll examine the ways in which the rise of television as a competing medium of mass entertainment shaped the stories that Hollywood movies told and the visual devices they used to dramatize these stories.

German 3351: Democracy, Fascism, and German Culture

Culture of the Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany in literature, film, the other arts; the roots of fascism and its echoes in postwar Germany. Taught in English.

History of Art 5901: Silent Cinema: 1895-1927                               

A study of the development of silent film as an international art form.

Japanese 4400: Japanese Film and Visual Culture                            

An overview of Japanese cinema and visual media, with a focus on genre: canonical and popular works of anime, yakuza film, historical/samurai film, comedies, and documentaries. Taught in English, no Japanese required.

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AAAS 3320/History 3310: History of African Cinema 

Emergence and development of African cinema as a film genre and part of material culture. European colonial and ethnographic to modern African cinema. Sometimes this course is offered in distance-only format.

AAAS 4571: Black Visual Culture and Popular Media

An examination of African Americans in visual culture and the theories of representation in popular media.

Chinese 4405: China in Chinese Film

An overview of Chinese cinema, with a focus on how film represents issues of nationhood, national identity, and national trauma. Taught in English, no Chinese required.

Comparative Studies 3607: Film and Literature as Narrative Art

Relationships between film and literature; emergence of cinematic art as a form of representation with emphasis on diverse cultural traditions.

EALL 3405 Introducing East Asia through Martial Arts Cinema 

Examines martial arts films of East Asia, focusing on their social & cultural functions. Draws upon the philosophical, cultural and historical background to depict this unique genre of imagination. Analyzes the aspiration for personal freedom and social justice and the longing for heroes amidst losing battles for liberty in authoritarian societies.
GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

English 4578: Film and American Society after WWII

This course examines the history of the American cinema in the years immediately following the Second World War, covering the period from 1945 to 1960. We will view and discuss significant Hollywood films from a variety of genres (e.g., comedy, musical, film noir, western, melodrama, social problem film), contextualizing them by reading articles and excerpts published in a variety of venues (e.g., popular magazines, film-trade publications, books of sociology and psychology) during the era in which these films were produced and exhibited. These textual primary sources will serve to illustrate historical discourses describing, reinforcing, and/or critiquing what were conceived of as significant social issues and shifts—from the “veterans problem,” to the “housing crisis,” to “juvenile delinquency,” to sexism, and residential segregation. In our discussions, we’ll be interested in how the assigned films reflected, responded to, and inflected the print debates happening around these issues and shifts—even and perhaps especially when the films are not overtly working in the “social problem” genre. We’ll also approach the films in the context of the upheavals happening in the American film industry during this period, as a result of the Paramount decree, the HUAC hearings, suburbanization, and declining movie theater attendance. In particular, we’ll examine the ways in which the rise of television as a competing medium of mass entertainment shaped the stories that Hollywood movies told and the visual devices they used to dramatize these stories.

English 4578: Re-Imagining the Half Hour: Contemporary Television Comedy

The televisual revolution of the first decade of the 21st century focused on shows like The SopranosThe Wire, and Breaking Bad—sprawling serial empires that reshaped the default format of storytelling seriousness, the hour-long drama.  But the last ten years have seen a shift of critical and viewer attention to the half-hour comedy, in terms of what kinds of stories are told, who gets to be in the stories, and who gets to tell the stories.  This course will consider a range of series, from Fleabag to Insecure to Russian Doll, that have cracked open the ancient conventions of the sitcom, and of comic design more broadly, to think across the spectrum of narrative invention and representational inclusion.  Throughout the semester, we will analyze how aesthetic and formal choices orient, and often disorient, our expectations of comedy as a televisual genre.  One recurrent thread in our syllabus will be shows created by and starring women, actively bringing previously-marginalized voices, perspectives, and bodies to the small screen.  In addition to FleabagInsecure, and Russian Doll, our roster may include: GirlsTransparentGLOWAtlantaBroad CityBarry; and What We Do in the Shadows.

History of Art 3901: World Cinema Today

An introduction to the art of international cinema today, including its forms and varied content. 
GE Visual and Performing Arts, GE Diversity: Global Studies.

History of Art 5001: Topics: Film Theory

Topics to be announced.

History of Art 5901: Silent Cinema: 1895-1927

A study of the development of silent film as an international art form.

Italian 2053: Italian Cinema

Survey of the Italian cinema from the beginnings to today, with special emphasis on neorealism. Taught in English. GE Visual and Performing Arts, GE Diversity: Global Studies.

Italian 2055: Mafia Movies    

Examines Italian and American mafia movies made from 1905 to the present day and traces the history of the Italian and Italian American Mafias. Taught in English. GE Visual and Performing Arts.

Japanese 4400: Japanese Film and Visual Culture

An overview of Japanese cinema and visual media, with a focus on genre: canonical and popular works of anime, yakuza film, historical/samurai film, comedies, and documentaries. Taught in English, no Japanese required.

Music 3344: Film Music 

A study of how music has functioned in film across its century-long history, as produced in Hollywood and in other countries, and by filmmakers independent of the studio system. 
GE Visual and Performing Arts.

Russian 3460.01: Modern Russian Experience through Film

Exploration of some of the most revealing hopes and disappointments of Russian people presented in internationally acclaimed Russian films. Taught in English. GE Visual and Performing Arts, GE Diversity: Global Studies

Russian 3460.99: Modern Russian Experience through Film Asynchronous Distance

Exploration of some of the most revealing hopes and disappointments of Russian people presented in internationally acclaimed Russian films. Taught in English. 100% online. GE Visual and Performing Arts, GE Diversity: Global Studies.

Slavic 3310: Science Fiction: East vs. West (Available In Person and Distance Learning)

Slavic, American, and British sci-fi on page and screen as reflection of major cultural concerns: progress, utopia, human perfectibility, limits of science and knowledge, gender, identity. Taught in English. GE Visual and Performing Arts, GE Diversity: Global Studies. 

Slavic 3360: Screening Minorities: Representations of the Other in Slavic Film 

Film representations of ethnic and religious others in East European cinema.  Taught in English. GE Visual and Performing Arts.

Spanish 4581: Spanish Film

Study of Spanish film; special attention is paid to the relationship between film and the society in which it is produced.

WGSS 2317: Gender and Cinema

A study of the representation of gender in relationship to race, sexuality, and class in cinema. Topics may include stardom, genre, narrative, national cinemas, women and minority filmmakers, and film history. GE Visual and Performing Arts.

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Film Studies 4895 

Selected problems (themes, movements, theories, genres, styles, etc.) in film studies; topics vary per semester.

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Moving-Image Production Major

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Moving Image Production 2202: Filmmaking Foundation II

This course is second in a sequence to introduce moving image production as an artistic, cultural, and multi-modal practice. It focuses on the building blocks of film grammar and offers an introduction to fundamental concepts and tools needed to work in the moving image, grounded in critical and historical context. Students use project-based learning to work independently and collaboratively.

Art 2000: Encountering Contemporary Art

Readings, lectures, discussions and field trips will introduce students to a diverse range of ideas, processes and contexts shaping the experience of visual art today.

Art 3555: Introduction to Digital Photography and Contemporary Issues

Students will learn fundamental digital camera techniques and explore contemporary and historical issues in photography including the relationships between technique, concept, and aesthetics as well as the relationship between images, identity formation, and larger social structures.

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ACCAD 5001: Motion Studies through Hand-Drawn Animation

The principles of animation as demonstrated through hand-drawn animation. The work produced serves as a tool for comprehending the underlying process of any animation technique.

ACCAD 5002: 3D Computer Animation: Form, Light and Motion I

Overview of 3D computer animation components and stages of production.

ACCAD 5100: Concept Development for Time-Based Media

Methods for developing concepts for time-based media through the cultivation of ideas and problem-solving strategies. Storyboarding, composition, editing and sound principles will be explored.

Art 4009: Film/Video II: Experimental Strategies

This course is designed as an overview of a broad range of strategies and issues unique to the practice sometimes labeled "experimental film," avant-garde cinema," or "video art." Intermediate theory and practice of creating film/video artwork. Emphasis on personal expression and experimental approaches.

THEATRE 5323: Film/Video Production II

Intermediate film/video analysis and production through research and project assignments with camera, sound, lighting, and editing techniques.

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Moving Image Production 4502: Senior Project II

The second of a two-semester experience in which students develop their individual or collaborative capstone project to completion. Students produce a creative work in the areas of animation, documentary, experimental or narrative or combinations of these modes. Group-oriented critiques advance projects to an finalized stage of development. A portfolio of creative work is completed.

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Graduate Courses for GIS

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Slavic 5457: Ideology and Viewers: East European Film and Media

This course explores the complex dynamics between ideology, propaganda, and the ways Russian, East European, and U.S. films and media 'tap into the political unconscious' of viewers. With the aid of audience studies and reception theory, the course examines film and media reception and the ideological factors which impact it from the early Soviet and socialist times to the present.

History of Art 5001: Film Theory 

Topics to be announced.

History of Art 5901: Silent Cinema: 1895-1927

A study of the development of silent film as an international art form.

Film Studies 7001: Advanced Theory Seminar: Methods and Applications

A theory and methods seminar which focuses on one scholarly approach to cinema (auteurism, formalism, historicism, feminism, etc).

English 7878: Seminar in Film and Media Studies: African American Film, 1960-Present

This course examines the history of African American film since the 1960s, a transformative period both within the American film industry and society at large. We will trace the recurring themes in African American cinema from that period through our present moment and familiarize ourselves with the diverse approaches to film artistry (narrative form, composition, genre, miss-en-scene) developed by African American filmmakers working both independently and in Hollywood. We will read relevant critical and theoretical texts in order to contextualize the visual materials, paying particular attention to how black film artists interrogate racist conventions of screen representation, negotiate questions of authorship and cultural authority, and reflect upon social injustices, like state violence and the systematic devaluation of Black lives.

Theatre 5323: Film/Video Production II

Intermediate film/video analysis and production through research and project assignments with camera, sound, lighting, and editing techniques.