Spring 2014

Prerequisite | Core | Multicultural or Elective | Pre-1950s or Elective | Non-Industrial or Elective | Other Electives | Senior Seminar | Group Studies Course (for focus area only) | Courses for Popular Focus Areas | Graduate

Note: Please check buckeyelink.osu.edu and a course's department page (English courses are scheduled by the English department, French by the French dept, etc) for the most accurate, up-to-date info. Some instructors' emails have been added below (click on their name) for popular courses requiring instructor permission. For others, please visit my.osu.edu and click on the linkt to the "find people" page to search for email addresses and contact information.

Japanese 4400 has been approved for the pre-1950s requirement. Check below for details.

AAAS 4571 has been canceled but will be offered in the May term.

German 3351 was canceled.

Prerequisite


English 2263 Introduction to Film

This course offers an introduction to the language and aesthetics of cinema,  familiarizing students with the basic building blocks of film, the forms that movies use to tell stories, communicate complex ideas, and dramatize social conflicts.  It also introduces students to significant developments in film history and ways of approaching film interpretation.   We will use each weekss film as both a case study in the strategic deployment of certain cinematic techniques, and as a specific set of images and sounds that combine to create a unique cinematic expression. 
Throughout the term, we will focus on detailed analysis of films, analyzing closely the ways in which the multiple elements of moviemaking come together to make, and complicate, meaning. Our primary goal in this class is to become skilled at thinking, talking, and writing critically about movies and, in the process, to deepen our appreciation and understanding of the film medium.   
Films may include: Citizen Kane, Vertigo, His Girl Friday, M, The Conversation, Cache , and The Thin Blue Line.
Requirements for the course include regular attendance, participation in recitations, quizzes, two papers and a final exam. GE VPA Course
Course Components: Lecture and One Recitation (Register for the MW lecture and one of the F recitations)
  • 20435 Lecture Meets: MW 12:40-1:35 pm Campbell Hall 0200 Instructor: Jesse E. Schotter
    • 20436 Recitation Meets: F 12:40-1:35 pm  Hayes Hall 0006 Instructor: Staff
    • 20437 Recitation Meets: F 12:40-1:35 pm Cockins Hall 0218 Instructor: Staff

Core

History of Art 2901 Introduction to World Cinema

Chronological survey of the most influential and recognized film artists and film movements of the world.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 260. GE VPA and diversity global studies cours
e.

  • 21411 Lecture Meets: Tu Th 9:35-10:55 am Stillman Hall 0100 Instructor: Kristina B. Paulsen
  • 21412 Lecture Meets: Tu Th 5:30-6:50 pm Jennings Hall 0155 Instructor: Staff

Film Studies 2271 Introduction to Film Studies for Majors

An introduction to the field of Film Studies based on a survey of the major theories of film analysis, specifically geared for incoming majors.
Prereq: English 2263 (263), or HistArt 2901 (260). Not open to students with credit for 2270 (270). Ge VPA course
.

  • 30393 Lecture Meets WF 3:55-5:15 pm Hagerty Hall 0046 Instructor: Staff

Multicultural (or Elective)

EALL 3446-0100 Asian American Film

Introduction to Asian American cinema from the 1960s to the present, including documentaries, feature films, and experimental films.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 346. GE VPA course.

  • 29054 Lecture Meets Tu Th 11:10 am-12:30 pm Mendenhall Lab 0131 Instructor: Kirk Alexander Denton

History of Art 3901 World Cinema Today

An introduction to the art of international cinema today, including its forms and varied content.
Prereq: Soph standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 350. GE VPA course
.

  • 21413 Lecture Meets  WF 2:20-3:40 pm Psychology Bldg 0002 Instructor: Staff
  • 21427 Lecture Meets Tu Th 5:30-6:50 pm University Hall 0014 Instructor: Staff

Russian 3460 Modern Russian Experience Through Film

Exploration of some of the most revealing hopes and disappointments of Russian people presented in internationally acclaimed Russian films. Taught in English.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 360. GE VPA and diversity global studies course
.

  • 26363 Lecture Meets Tu Th 9:35-10:55 am Denney Hall 0238 Instructor: Staff
  • 26364 Lecture Meets WF 11:10 am-12:30 pm Denney Hall 0238 Instructor: Staff
  • 31821 Lecture Meets Tu Th 3:55-5:15 pm Dreese Lab 0369 Instructor: Staff
     

Pre-1950s (or Elective)

History of Art 5901-0010 Silent Cinema, 1895-1927

A study of the develoment of silent film as an international art form.
Prereq: Soph standing. Not open to students with credit for 647.

  • 30432 & 30433 Lecture Meets Tu Th 2:20-3:40 pm Hitchcock Hall 0031 Instructor: Staff

Film Studies 4580 Studies in a Major Director

Course is now open to all grade levels; FR, SO, JR, SR- as long as they have taken FS 2271. The course counts for an upper level elective, or pre 1950s, or Avant Garde course in the Film Studies major.

Join us as we examine the challenging, thrilling, and roiling history of avant-garde film and video. Situated somewhere between the more definable realms of commercial cinema on one hand and the art world on the other, experimental filmmaking's nebulous position in the world allows it to explore ideas of form and content in a more direct (and radical) way than is usually possible. This course will provide an introductory survey of avant-garde cinema and its many sub-genres, as well as the larger context that allows these films to circulate in the world ? including ideas and histories of curation, distribution, presentation, technologies, and more.
Prereq: 2271 or 2367.01, and Jr standing, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs

  • 20850 Lecture Meets WF12:45-2:05 pm Hagerty Hall 0046 Instructor: Staff

Japanese 4400 Japanese Film and Visual Culture

An overview of Japanese cinema and visual media, with a focus on genre: canonical and popular works of anime, yakuza film, historical/samurai film, comedies, and documentaries. Taught in English, no Japanese required.

  • 29928 Lecture Meets MW 2:20-3:40 pm Campbell Hall 0309 Instructor: Kerim Yasar

Non-Industrial / Avant Garde- Experimental (or Elective)

Film Studies 4580 Studies in a Major Director

Course is now open to all grade levels; FR, SO, JR, SR- as long as they have taken FS 2271. The course counts for an upper level elective, or pre 1950s, or Avant Garde course in the Film Studies major.

Join us as we examine the challenging, thrilling, and roiling history of avant-garde film and video. Situated somewhere between the more definable realms of commercial cinema on one hand and the art world on the other, experimental filmmaking's nebulous position in the world allows it to explore ideas of form and content in a more direct (and radical) way than is usually possible. This course will provide an introductory survey of avant-garde cinema and its many sub-genres, as well as the larger context that allows these films to circulate in the world ? including ideas and histories of curation, distribution, presentation, technologies, and more.
Prereq: 2271 or 2367.01, and Jr standing, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs

  • 20850 Lecture Meets WF12:45-2:05 pm Hagerty Hall 0046 Instructor: Staff

 Other Electives

Comp Studies 3607-0010 Film and Literature as Narrative Art

Relationships between film and literature; emergence of cinematic art as a form of representation with emphasis on diverse cultural traditions.
Prereq: English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 3607H (358H, 358). GE VPA and diversity global studies course
.

  • 18377 Lecture Meets M 12:10-2:00 pm Mendenhall Lab 0125 and WF 12:40-1:35 pm University Hall 0038 Instructor: M Andrew Curtis Culp WF Staff

Comp Studies 3607H-0010 Film and Literature as Narrative Art

Relationships between film and literature; emergence of cinematic art as a form of representation with emphasis on diverse cultural traditions.
Prereq: Honors standing and English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 3607 (358H, 358). GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • 18456 Lecture Meets M 10:05-11:55 am Hagerty 0050 and  Tu Th 11:30-12:25 pm Hayes 0006 Instructor: Maurice E. Stevens

English 3378 Special Topics for Film and Literature (for minor only)

In this course, we will study some of the most innovative and influential films ever made of Shakespeare?s plays. We will both read specific plays (probably Richard III, A Midsummer Night?s Dream, Romeo and Juliet, Henry V, Hamlet, Titus Andronicus, and Macbeth) and view films that cut across dramatic genres, time periods, countries, and cinematic styles, by such directors as Reinhardt and Dieterle, Olivier, Kurosawa, Branagh, Luhrmann, Almereyda, Pacino, and Taymor. We will focus on how directors and actors have chosen to adapt Shakespeare for performance, but also consider how these films have shaped, and continue to shape, the cultural meaning of "Shakespeare" for modern audiences.
Requirements will include two or three essays, several quizzes, a midterm, a final exam, regular attendance, and active participation.

Focuses on the relationship between film and literature; topics may include adaptation, cross-media themes and modes, influence of cinema on literature and vice versa.
Prereq: 1110.01 (110.01) or equiv. Not open to students with 10 qtr cr hrs for 378. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs. GE cultures and ideas course.

 
  • 20484 Lecture Meets WF 9:35-10:55 am Denney Hall 0238 Instructor: Staff
  • Topic: Shakespeare and Film

English 4578 Special Topics in Film

Examination of particular topics, themes, genres, or movements in cinema; topics may include particular directors (Orson Welles), periods (The Sixties), genres (horror).
Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 cr hrs of English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. 5 qtr cr hrs in 367 or 3 cr hrs in 2367 in any subject is acceptable towards the 6 cr hrs. Not open to students with 15 qtr cr hrs for 578 or 9 sem cr hrs for 4578 or 4578H. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs
.

  • 20520 Lecture Meets Tu Th 9:35-10:55 am Denney Hall 0253 Instructor: Mark Edward Conroy
    • Course description - Special Topics in Film. Noir: The Rise, Fall, and Rise of a Style
      The history of that thing called "film noir" is always intriguing for two reasons: 1. American commercial cinema was not supposed to produce downbeat results like that, especially around mid-century; and 2. The form itself didn't get a definition until it was almost over (by the late 1950s). This strange style, with its morally ambiguous heroes, corrupt social arrangements and shaded endings, never dominated; but it survives to this day. Ironically, noir may not have become a recognizable genre, i.e. something viewers understood about when they went into the theater, until the revival (by around 1980). By dint of historical instances, and some readings in the critics, we try to define this elusive style of filmmaking-but not define it too precisely either. We'll try to shine just enough light to see the dark.
      READINGS AND SHOWINGS: This list is neither exhaustive nor final, but tentative selections include: The Maltese Falcon, Shadow of a Doubt, Murder, My Sweet, Double Indemnity, The Big Sleep, Out of the Past, Gilda, Where the Sidewalk Ends, Touch of Evil, and Kiss Me Deadly, for the first strain of noir; and Chinatown, The Long Goodbye, Body Heat, Taxi Driver, Blue Velvet and Fargo for "neo-noir." Our readings will be from Naremore's More Than Night, along with a few articles on noir from the Film Noir Reader volumes perhaps.
      Duties: We're looking at a couple of exams, midterm and final; perhaps a short (4-pp.) paper; and some quizzes, along with class participation of course.

       
  • 20521 Lecture Meets Tu Th 12:45-2:05 pm Hagerty Hall 0046 Instructor: Jon Elmer Erickson
    • Course description - Drama into Film: Tennessee Williams: This course will examine major plays by one of the most important 20th century American dramatists, Tennessee Williams, and the way they have been adapted for the screen, featuring some of the most prestigious actors and film directors of the 1950s and 1960s.  Points of focus will include: the culture of the American South after World War II, its class divisions, the psycho-sexual construction of identity and character and its bearing on relations within and between the sexes, and the hope for love and spiritual fulfillment in contexts of vulgar materialism and mean-spiritedness.  Williams called his own style "poetic realism."  How are we to characterize this style, and when and where does it work or not?   We will also see what is lost or gained by the translation from stage to screen.  Given the moral climate of the time, what elements in the plays were seen as unacceptable on the screen, and how do the film directors deal with these issues? 
      Readings and films;  A Streetcar Named Desire, Baby Doll, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, The Rose Tattoo, Orpheus Descending/The Fugitive Kind,  Suddenly Last Summer,  Summer and Smoke,  Sweet Bird of Youth, and The Night of the Iguana. 
      Assignments: Weekly 1-2 page response papers, two 7-10 page papers
  • 20522 Lecture Meets WF 3:55-5:15 pm Denney Hall 0214 Instructor: James John Griffith
    • Course description - Special Topics in Film: Alfred Hitchcock
      Alfred Hitchcock is one of the most meticulous and masterful film directors in cinematic history, and, in this course, we will study his work in depth. The program will include a pair of early British productions (Blackmail and The Thirty-Nine Steps), move on to two films that mark his settling into America (Rebecca and Notorious), and finish with four of the masterpieces from his richest period (Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, and Psycho). Our first concern will be a formal understanding and appreciation of the films, but the reading should take us into a variety of theoretical frameworks and critical issues.
      Texts will include Robin Wood's Hitchcock's Films Revisited and Tania Modleski's The Women Who Knew Too Much; assignments will include two essays and an exam.
      Undergraduate Major or Minor course in English, Film Studies Major or Minor Course

French 3701 Introduction to French Cinema

Introduction to the study of French cinema, French film history and the art of the cinema.
Prereq: 3101 (401). Not open to students with credit for 470
.

  • 28093 Lecture Meets WF 3:55-5:15 pm Hagerty Hall 0042 Instructor: Staff

French 5702 Studies in French Cinema

Study of the history and aesthetics of French cinema. Taught in English.
Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 sem cr hrs in Literature and/or Cinema taken at the 2000 (200) level, or permission of instructor; or Grad standing, and permission of the Graduate Studies Chair in consultation with student's advisor. Not open to students with credit for 672. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

  • 20903 & 20904 (combined section) Lecture Meets Tu Th 3:55-5:15 pm Stillman Hall 235 Instructor: Staff

Italian 2055 Mafia Movies

The Mafia in Italy is referred to as an octopus as the organization has pervaded almost every facet of Italian cultural life. Tony Soprano, Don Vito and Michael Corleone, Lucky Luciano, Robert De Niro, Salvatore Giuliano, Martin Scorsese, Placido Rizzotto, Peppino Impastato, Christopher Moltisanti and Leonardo Sciascia are some of the historical and fictional figures that contribute to the myth of the Italian and Italian-American Mafias. In this course we will identify these and other protagonists of mafia folklore and explore the myth of the Mafia that is so widespread in America, and trace its history and function as it passes across time and through multiple cultures. We will question whether there exists a unique American or Italian cinema treating the Mafia and explore how filmmakers from the two countries approach the subject in dissimilar fashions, especially in terms of stereotyping, gender roles, andrepresentations of violence. Readings and films include works by Martin Scorsese, Leonardo Sciascia, Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, Elio Petri, Francis Ford Coppola, Luchino Visconti, Howard Hawkes, David Chase, Francesco Rosi, Marco Tullio Giordana, Pasquale Scimeca, Matteo Garrone, John Dickie, Anton Blok and Renate Siebert. Taught in English. GE VPA course.

  • 21511 Lecture Meets Tu Th 11:10-12:30 pm Stillman Hall 0100 Instructor: Dana Renga

Slavic 3360 Screening Minorities: Representations of The Other in Slavic Films

Film representations of ethnic and religious others in East European cinema.  Taught in English.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 360. GE VPA course.

  • 26397 Lecture Meets Tu Th 12:45-2:05 pm McPherson 1045 Instructor: Izolda Wolski-Moskoff

Spanish 4580-1 Latin American Film

Study of Latin American film; special attention is paid to the relationship between film and the society in which it is produced.
Prereq: A grade of C- or above in 3450 (450) or 3450H (450H). Not open to students with credit for 580. FL Admis Cond course
.

  • 26841 Lecture Meets MW 2:20-3:40 pm Hagerty Hall 0259 Instructor: Staff

Spanish 4581-1 Spanish Film

Study of Spanish film; special attention is paid to the relationship between film and the society in which it is produced.
Prereq: A grade of C- or above in 3450 (450) or 3450H (450H). Not open to students with credit for 581. FL Admis Cond course.

  • 30684 Lecture Meets WF 11:10-12:30 pm Hagerty Hall 0056 Instructor: Staff

Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies 3317 Hollywood, Women, & Film

A critical survey of the rep. of women in Hollywood cinema, examples drawn from the 1930's to present. Learn how film has functioned in its representation of women and how and why women film makers have created alternative visions of women in film.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 317. GE VPA course

  • 27578 Lecture Meets WF 12:45-2:05 pm Fontana Lab 0142 Instructor: Erin Christine Tobin
  • 27579 Lecture Meets Tu Th 2:20-3:40 pm Cunz Hall 0160 Instructor: Linda Mizejewski

Senior Seminar

Film Studies 4895 Advanced Seminar: Topics in Film Studies

Selected problems (themes, movements, theories, genres, styles, etc.) in film studies; topics vary per semester.
Prereq: Enrollment in FilmStd major, and Sr standing, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs
.

  • 30275 Lecture Meets Tu Th 2:20-3:40 pm Hagerty Hall 0071 Instructor: Laura Podalsky
  • Course description:

    This seminar examines the complex interfaces between cinema and history.  During the quarter, we will consider how particular films from different decades (and different countries) represent the past.  What is at stake in public and scholarly debates that praise certain historical films (Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan) while vilifying others (e.g. Stone’s JFK; Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds)?  How have filmmakers such as Derek Jarman (Caravaggio) and Carla Camurati (Carlota Joaquina, Princess of Brazil) challenged conventions of historical realism?  How do the aesthetic models employed in more experimental films register and/or promote particular understandings of history and of temporality?  As we explore these issues, the course will move beyond the question of representation to examine the relationship of the cinema to history as discipline.  In what ways has the cinema depended upon historical research and promoted a “desire” for the past? How have scholars conceptualized the history of cinema(s)?  What types of methodologies have they used?   How have scholars from other disciplines utilized film to understand social, political, and economic dynamics in particular periods?

     In examining these issues, we will read the work of a variety of film scholars including Phil Rosen, Vivian Sobchack, Marcia Landy, Thomas Elsaesser, Laura Marks,  and see a wide range of films, some of which may include Inglorious Basterds, Daughters of the Dust, Bontoc Eulogy, Caravaggio, The First Charge of the Machete,  

    For their final assignment, students will develop an in-depth, independent research project on a topic of their choice related to the interface between history and film.

Courses for Popular Focus Areas (these are not Film Studies Major Electives but are possibilities for creating the Focus Area)

Production Focus

Film Studies 4194 Group Studies

Group studies for work in various fields of film studies not normally offered in courses.
Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs or 3 completions.

Prereq: 2271, 2270, or 270. Instructor consent required. Email the instructor or Film Studies Program to obtain enrollment permission. This course counts as part of the focus area only.
30253 Lecture Meets Tu Th 11:10 am-12:30 pm Sullivant Hall 0343 Instructor: Mitchell Rose
Topic: Filmmaking - Hitchcock said that silent films were “the purest form of cinema” and that filmmakers “should resort to dialogue only when it’s impossible to do otherwise.” This is a class in making short films from that perspective—new silent movies (or at least dialogue-limited movies) that are poetic, conceptual... that explore the nontraditional narrative. Class participants will explore film grammar, experimental narrative and structure, and contemporary/historical context through hands-on creative work, classroom viewings and discussion, and readings. Participants will learn camera use, storyboarding, Final Cut Pro X editing, and will work towards producing a final short film, as well as several smaller film projects.

The class, intended for those who already have filmmaking or media-creating experience, will embrace the no-budget school of independent filmmaking, creating work will little more than a consumer camera or smartphone... but with ample imagination and a passion for the moving image.

The class will meet in the Media Lab in the Department of Dance where there are iMac workstations with Final Cut Pro X.  But students must provide their own camera and hard drive.
Camera: A consumer video camera can be used, as can a smartphone that has sufficient memory. A tripod is highly recommended. If using a smartphone, a student should get a GorillaPod or similar device to hold the smartphone and/or attach it to a standard tripod.

Hard Drives: Students will store their media and class materials on a portable hard drive. Video editing demands a very fast data stream from a hard drive. You need a hard drive that has these specs: • USB 3.0 • disk rotation speed of 7200rpm

Theater 5321-0010 Video Production I

Basic video production through research and project assignments.  Basic camera, sound, lighting and editing techniques will be practiced in collaborative and individual settings.
Prereq: Permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 634
.

  • 27397 & 27398 Lab Meets Tu Th 3:55-5:15 pm Drake Center 2060 Instructor: David L Fisher

Theater 5323-0010 Video Production II

Exploration of intermediate video analysis and production through research and project assignments with camera, sound, lighting and editing techniques.
Prereq: 5322. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs
.

  • 27353 & 27354 Lab Meets Tu Th 9:10-11:15 am Drake Center 2060 Instructor: Janet S Parrott

Screenwriting Focus

Theater 5331 Screenwriting

Exploration of creative script-writing for video/cinema; development of short or feature length scripts.
Prereq: Permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 636
.

  • 27399 & 27400 Lecture Meets Tu Th 12:45-2:05 pm Baker Systems 0272 Instructor: Scott Alan Spears
  • 27401 & 27402 Lecture Meets Tu Th 3:55-5:15 pm Baker Systems 0272 Instructor: Scott Alan Spears

Film Studies 4880 Screenwriting and the Business of Cinema

This course examines screenwriting as both a literary art form and a challenging profession.
Prereq: Theatre 5331 (636), or permission of instructor. Not open to credit to students with credit for 680.

Film Studies 4890 Advanced Screenwriting

An intensive writing course in which each student completes a feature-length screenplay based on work previously completed in Film Studies 680 or Film Studies 4880.
Prereq:4880 (680), and permission of director. Not open to students with credit for 69
0.

Graduate

English 4578 Special Topics in Film

Examination of particular topics, themes, genres, or movements in cinema; topics may include particular directors (Orson Welles), periods (The Sixties), genres (horror).
Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 cr hrs of English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. 5 qtr cr hrs in 367 or 3 cr hrs in 2367 in any subject is acceptable towards the 6 cr hrs. Not open to students with 15 qtr cr hrs for 578 or 9 sem cr hrs for 4578 or 4578H. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs
.

  • 20520 Lecture Meets Tu Th 9:35-10:55 am Denney Hall 0253 Instructor: Mark Edward Conroy
    • Course description - The Kael Era: This course examines the spate of artistically ambitious films that came out of Hollywood, of all places, in the late sixties through eighties.  Our way of framing these films will be in part by taking up the role played by the then-crucial movie critic Pauline Kael both in publicizing specific films and also in making the case for the general trend toward adventuresome, serious moviemaking that (in her view) such films seemed to betoken. 
      Goal is to understand the interaction between criticism and creative material; how that interaction became so important during this period; and why it ceased to matter afterward.  Films to include Chinatown, Bonnie and Clyde, Annie Hall, The Godfather, Part Two, Taxi Driver, The Long Goodbye, and others. 
      Texts: Brian Kellow's biography Pauline Kael: A Life in the Dark and the Library of America's edition of Kael's criticism. 
      Duties: a 4-5 pp. paper, midterm and final, along with possible quizzes.
  • 20521 Lecture Meets Tu Th 12:45-2:05 pm Hagerty Hall 0046 Instructor: Jon Elmer Erickson
    • Course description - Drama into Film: Tennessee Williams: This course will examine major plays by one of the most important 20th century American dramatists, Tennessee Williams, and the way they have been adapted for the screen, featuring some of the most prestigious actors and film directors of the 1950s and 1960s.  Points of focus will include: the culture of the American South after World War II, its class divisions, the psycho-sexual construction of identity and character and its bearing on relations within and between the sexes, and the hope for love and spiritual fulfillment in contexts of vulgar materialism and mean-spiritedness.  Williams called his own style "poetic realism."  How are we to characterize this style, and when and where does it work or not?   We will also see what is lost or gained by the translation from stage to screen.  Given the moral climate of the time, what elements in the plays were seen as unacceptable on the screen, and how do the film directors deal with these issues? 
      Readings and films;  A Streetcar Named Desire, Baby Doll, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, The Rose Tattoo, Orpheus Descending/The Fugitive Kind,  Suddenly Last Summer,  Summer and Smoke,  Sweet Bird of Youth, and The Night of the Iguana. 
      Assignments: Weekly 1-2 page response papers, two 7-10 page papers
  • 20522 Lecture Meets WF 3:55-5:15 pm Denney Hall 0214 Instructor: James John Griffith
    • Course description - Special Topics in Film: Alfred Hitchcock
      Alfred Hitchcock is one of the most meticulous and masterful film directors in cinematic history, and, in this course, we will study his work in depth. The program will include a pair of early British productions (Blackmail and The Thirty-Nine Steps), move on to two films that mark his settling into America (Rebecca and Notorious), and finish with four of the masterpieces from his richest period (Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, and Psycho). Our first concern will be a formal understanding and appreciation of the films, but the reading should take us into a variety of theoretical frameworks and critical issues.
      Texts will include Robin Wood's Hitchcock's Films Revisited and Tania Modleski's The Women Who Knew Too Much; assignments will include two essays and an exam.
      Undergraduate Major or Minor course in English, Film Studies Major or Minor Course

French 5702 Contemporary French Cinema

Study of the history and aesthetics of French cinema. Taught in English.
Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 sem cr hrs in Literature and/or Cinema taken at the 2000 (200) level, or permission of instructor; or Grad standing, and permission of the Graduate Studies Chair in consultation with student's advisor. Not open to students with credit for 672. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

  • 20903 & 20904 Lecture Meets T Th 3:55-5:15 Stillman Hall 0235 Instructor: Staff

History of Art 5901-0010 Silent Cinema, 1895-1927

A study of the develoment of silent film as an international art form.
Prereq: Soph standing. Not open to students with credit for 647.

  • 30432 & 30433 Lecture Meets T Th 2:20-3:40 pm Hitchcock Hall 0031 Instructor: Staff

Italian 8242 Studies in Italian Culture: Gender and Genre (*course is under consideration for the GIS; check with Film Studies before registering)

Examines representations of gender in film, literature, poetry or other media. May focus on one period/issue or address a center or longer time period.
Prereq: Doctorial and MA candidates, or qualified undergraduates with permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs. FL Admis Cond course.

  • 28077 Lecture Meets T 2:15-5 pm Hagerty Hall 206 Instructor: Dana Renga

supplemental list

German 8400 Seminar in Film, Visual Culture, and the Performing Arts

Advanced graduate seminar allowing students to broaden their engagement with non-literary culture based in German-speaking texts and to conduct research into targeted areas of interest.
Prereq: 6200, or Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs. Admis Cond course.

  • 29584 Seminar Meets M 12:30-3:15 pm Hagerty Hall 488 Instructor: John Davidson

History of Art 8641 The Wexner Center Seminar

Graduate seminar offered in conjunction with Wexner exhibitions, performance series, media series, or symposia; may be taught by visiting artists, performers, or critics.
Repeatable to a maximum of 12 cr hrs or 12 completions. Cross-listed in CompStd 8891.

  • 30421 Seminar Meets W 2:15-5 pm Pomerene Hall 215 Instructor: Staff

Women's Studies 8860 Topics in Feminist Methodology

Advanced study of variable topics relating to feminist methodology, methods, and research.
Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs or 30 completions.

  • 30862 Seminar Meets W 5:15-8 pm University Hall 286A Instructor: Wendy Smooth

 

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