Spring 2016

Please check Buckeyelink and/or refer to a course's home department for any questions about course topics, instructors, or schedules. You can find instructor contact information on the department's homepage or using the people find seach engine on my.osu.edu.

Prerequisite Core Non-Industrial | Multicultural |
Pre-1950s | Senior Seminar | Electives Minor Only |
Graduate (GIS) | Courses of Interest Outside the Major and Minor

Prerequisite

English 2263 Introduction to Film

Introduction to methods of reading film texts by analyzing cinema as technique, as system, and as cultural product.
Prereq: 1110.01 (110.01) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 263. GE VPA course. Register for the lecture section and *one* of the recitations

  • Lecture: 18782 Meets: T Th 12:45-2:05 pm Sullivant Hall 220  Instructor: Ryan Friedman
  • Recitation: 18783 Meets: F 12:40-1:35 pm Enarson Classroom Building 0222 Instructor: Staff
  • Recitation: 18784 Meets: F 12:40-1:35 pm Enarson Classroom Building 0226 Instructor: Staff
  • Recitation: 18785 Meets: F 12:40-1:35 pm Enarson Classroom Building 0358 Instructor: Staff
  • Recitation: 18786 Meets: F 1:50-2:45 pm Enarson Classroom Building 0230 Instructor: Staff
  • Recitation: 27403 Meets: F 11:30-12:25 pm Enarson Classroom Building 0258 Instructor: Staff
  • Recitation: 27404 Meets: F 11:30-12:25 pm Enarson Classroom Building 0230 Instructor: Staff

Core

Film Studies 2271 Introduction to Film Studies for Majors

An introduction to the field of Film Studies based on a survey of the major theories of film analysis, specifically geared for incoming majors.
Prereq: English 2263 (263), or HistArt 2901 (260). Not open to students with credit for 2270 (270). Ge VPA course.

  • Lecture: 25427 Meets: T Th 11:10-12:30 pm Hagerty Hall 062 Instructor: Christopher Jeansonne

History of Art 2901 Intro to World Cinema

Chronological survey of the most influential and recognized film artists and film movements of the world.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 260. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • Lecture: 19255 Meets: T Th 9:35-10:55 am Jennings Hall 001 Instructor: Kristina Paulsen
  • Lecture: 19256 Meets: T Th 5:30-6:50 pm Scott Lab E001 Instructor: Staff

Non-Industrial (or elective)

Avant-Garde

Film Studies 4640 Studies in Cinema History

An upper-level course on aspects of film history geard toward film studies majors.
Prereq: 2270 or 2271, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

  • Lecture: 27036 Meets: T Th 12:45-2:05 pm Hagerty Hall 062 Instructor: Jane Greene
    • Class Title: American Film Since 1970
    • *One-term exception for Non-Industrial Requirement*

Multicultural (or elective)

History of Art 3901 World Cinema Today

An introduction to the art of international cinema today, including its forms and varied content.
Prereq: Soph standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 350. GE VPA course.

  • Lecture: 19257 Meets: T Th 2:20-3:40 pm Sullivant Hall 0220 Instructor: Erica Levin
  • Lecutre: 19261 Meets: M W 5:30-6:50 pm Jennings Hall 0155 Instructor: Staff

Russian 3460 Modern Russian Experience Through Film

Exploration of some of the most revealing hopes and disappointments of Russian people presented in internationally acclaimed Russian films. Taught in English.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 360. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • Lecture: 23492 Meets: T Th 3:55-5:15 pm University Hall 086 Instructor: Staff
  • Lecture: 23493 Meets: W F 12:45-2:05 pm Jennings Hall 060 Instructor: Yana Hashamova
  • Lecture: 30933 Meets: W F 9:35-10:55 am Campbell Hall 213 Instructor: Staff

Pre-1950s (or elective)

German 3351 Democracy, Fascism, and German Culture

Culture of the Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany in literature, film, the other arts; the roots of fascism and its echoes in postwar Germany. Taught in English.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 299. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course.

  • Lecture: 26920 Meets: T Th 2:20-3:40 pm Mendenhall Lab 125 Instructor: John Davidson

Japanese 4400 Japanese Film and Visual Media

An overview of Japanese cinema and visual media, with a focus on genre: canonical and popular works of anime, yakuza film, historical/samurai film, comedies, and documentaries. Taught in English, no Japanese required.

  • Lecture: 25274 Meets: T Th 3:55-5:15 pm Mendenhall Lab 191 Instructor: Kerim Yasar

Senior Seminar (can be repeated as elective)

Film Studies 4580 Studies in a Major Director

A course in the films, style, themes, and career of a single director. 

Prereq: 2271 or 2367.01, and Jr standing, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

  • Lecture: 18944 Meets: M 2:15-5:00 pm Cunz Hall 180 Instructor: Helena Goscilo
    • *One-term exception for Senior Seminar Requirement*
    • Class TitleThe Films of the Polish filmmaker Roman Polanski

Electives (see categories above for more elective options)

Comparative Studies 3607 Film and Literature as Narrative Art

Relationships between film and literature; emergence of cinematic art as a form of representation with emphasis on diverse cultural traditions.
Prereq: English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 3607H (358H, 358). GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • Lecture: 17120 Meets: M W F 11:30-12:25 pm University Hall 056 Instructor: Jason Payne

English 4578 Special Topics in Film

Examination of particular topics, themes, genres, or movements in cinema; topics may include particular directors (Orson Welles), periods (The Sixties), genres (horror).
Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 cr hrs of English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. 5 qtr cr hrs in 367 or 3 cr hrs in 2367 in any subject is acceptable towards the 6 cr hrs. Not open to students with 15 qtr cr hrs for 578 or 9 sem cr hrs for 4578 or 4578H. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs. Please check buckeyelink.com and english.osu.edu for course topics.

  • Lecture: 18824 Meets: W F 12:45-2:05 pm Denney Hall 253 Instructor: Mark Conroy
    • ​Film Noir
      • ​This course will examine the phenomenon sometimes known as film noir, from its roots in the cinema of the 1940s (Double Indemnity, Murder My Sweet, and The Big Sleep, among others) to its diminution in the 1950s (Kiss Me Deadly, Touch of Evil, and Sunset Boulevard).  Finally, we'll look at noir's latterday revival in what has come to be called "neo-noir" (Body Heat, L. A. Confidential, Taxi Driver, Chinatown and others).  Along the way, we'll discuss a number of issues that arise with noir: What does the form say about the relations between the sexes, and masculine roles?  About urban modernity?  What accounts for its near-complete domination of the field of modern drama, in TV even more than in movies?  Can one fairly distinguish among types of noir filmmaking and storytelling?  Readings in Naremore's More Than Night and various articles.  Duties to consist in one paper and a couple of exams.
  • Lecture: 32154 Meets: T Th 12:45-2:05 pm Gateway Film Center House 4 Instructor: Frederick Aldama
    • ​Global Sci-Fi: Race, Disability, and Sexuality
      • ​In this course we will explore how authors and scriptwriters, cinematographers and editors, and of course, above all, film directors, comic book writers and artists, and short story writers distill our present and past reality  then reconstruct it and create it anew as hypothetical and counterfactual storyworlds set in past- and future-oriented times and places in the format of science-fiction.
        We will consider centrally how issues of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and disability figure into this creative reconstruction, building and rebuilding process within the science-fiction format. We will contextualize and assess key critical interpretations, perspectives, developments and debates in the study of past-and future science-fiction world-building and its consumption. We will consider the importance of historical period and region in the making and consuming of these science-fiction storyworlds, including how different storytelling formats offer shared and different techniques to give these science-fiction worlds their shape. Here we will consider how some evince a greater will to style than others that seek simply to extrapolate the capitalist barbarism of our present society without imagining interesting and even compelling stories of life (thoughts and feeling systems) devoid of exploitation, racism, misogyny . . .hatred and misanthropy generally.
        *See Buckeyelink for more information*
  • Lecture: 32159 Meets: T Th 2:20-3:40 pm Ramseyer Hall 110 Instructor: Jon Erickson

Film Studies 4580 Studies in a Major Director

A course in the films, style, themes, and career of a single director.

Prereq: 2271 or 2367.01, and Jr standing, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

  • Lecture: 18944 Meets: M 2:15-5:00 pm Cunz Hall 180 Instructor: Helena Goscilo
    • Class TitleThe Films of the Polish filmmaker Roman Polanski

French 3701 Introduction to French Cinema

Introduction to the study of French cinema, French film history and the art of the cinema.
Prereq: 3101 (401). Not open to students with credit for 470.

  • Lecture: 27682 Meets: T Th 2:20-3:40 pm University Hall 090 Instructor: Staff

Italian 2055 Mafia Movies

Examines Italian and American mafia movies made from 1905 to the present day and traces the history of the Italian and Italian American Mafias. Taught in English. GE VPA course.

  • Lecture: 30815 Meets: T Th 11:10-12:30 pm Gateway Film Center House 1 Instructor: Dana Renga

Italian 4223 Italian Cinema

Examination of Italian cinema from Neorealism to the present. Discussion of contemporary society and culture with a brief introduction to film theory. Not open to students who are native speakers of Italian.
Prereq: One course at the 3000 (400) level or above, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 613. FL Admis Cond course.

  • Lecture: 30846 Meets: T Th 2:20-3:40 pm Hagerty Hall 046 Instructor: Staff

Slavic 3360 Screening Minorities: Representations of the Other in Slavic Film

Flm representations of ethnic and religious others in East European cinema. Taught in English.
Prereq: Not open to students with creedit for 360. GE VPA course.

  • Lecture: 23520 Meets: W F 2:20-3:40 pm Hagerty Hall 042 Instructor: Staff

Spanish 4580 Latin American Film

Study of Latin American film; special attention is paid to relationship between film and the society in which it is produced.
Prereq: A grade of C- or above in 3450 (450) or 3450H (450H). Not open to students with credit for 580. FL Admis Cond course.

  • Lecture: 23866 Meets: W F 12:45-2:05 pm Hagerty Hall 0259 Instructor: Ignacio Corona

Spanish 4581 Spanish Film

Study of Spanish film; special attention is paid to the relationship between film and the society in which it is produced.
Prereq: A grade of C- or above in 3450 (450) or 3450H (450H). Not open to students with credit for 581. FL Admis Cond course.

  • Lecture: 25561 Meets: W F 9:35-10:55 am Hagerty Hall 0255 Instructor: Staff

WGSS 3317  Hollywood, Women, and Film

critical survey of the rep. of women in Hollywood cinema, examples drawn from the 1930's to present. Learn how film has functioned in its representation of women and how and why women film makers have created alternative visions of women in film.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 317. GE VPA course.

  • Lecture: 24493 Meets: T Th 11:10-12:30 pm University Hall 090 Instructor: Linda Mizejewski
  • Lecture: 24494 Meets: T Th 5:30-6:50 pm University Hall 090 Instructor: Jonathan Branfman

Minor Only Courses

English 3378 Special Topics in Film and Literature

Focuses on the relationship between film and literature; topics may include adaptation, cross-media themes and modes, influence of cinema on literature and vice versa.
Prereq: English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with 10 qtr cr hrs on 378. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 hrs. GE cultures and ideas course.

  • Lecture: 18811 Meets: W F 2:20-3:40 pm Knowlton Hall 195 Instructor: Alan Farmer

Graduate (GIS) Courses

Art Education 5835 Visual Representations of LGBT Subjects

Survey of social standpoints on visual culture and cinematic representations of (homo)sexualities through readings, film viewings, class discussions and presentations of independent research.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 835. Undergraduate enrollment permitted with instructor permission. Contact James Sanders at sanders-iii.1@osu.edu.

  • Seminar: 31337, 31338 Meets: T Th 6:00-8:00 pm Sullivant Hall 251 Instructor: James Sanders

Chinese 7468 Chinese Film

Examination of Chinese film history from its beginnings to the present.
Prereq: 7463; or permission of the instructor.

Note the different meeting times and days.

  • Lecture: 31157 Meets: M 2:15-5:00 pm W 2:20-5:15 pm Derby Hall 062 Instructor: Kirk Denton

English 6778.01 Introduction to Graduate Study in Film and Film Theory

An advanced survey of the methodologies, contexts, and development of film and film theory.
Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 6778.01 (778) or 6778.02.

  • Seminar: 31837, 31838 Meets: Th 9:10-12:10 pm Denney Hall 435 Instructor: Jane Chen

Film Studies 7001 Advanced Theory Seminar: Methods and Applications

A theory and methods seminar which focuses on one scholarly approach to cinema (auteurism, formalism, historicism, feminism, etc.).
Prereq: Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

  • Lecture: 27039 Meets: T 2:20-5:15 pm Denney Hall 268 Instructor: Jesse Schotter
    • Advanced Theory Seminar: Theory of the Silent Era
      • This course takes an historicist approach to film studies, exploring the debates and questions surrounding silent film through an examination of writings by directors and theorists of that era.  Rather than looking at present-day interpretations of the films of the 1910s and 20s, we will attempt to recapture how writers of the period attempted to make sense of the flux and ferment of their own nascent medium of cinema.  In so doing, we will examine not only those critics whose ideas went on to be influential, but also those who have been largely forgotten.  We will rediscover the paths of cinema not taken: the forgotten debates that remain relevant to contemporary issues in film studies.  Throughout, we will compare one era of filmic possibility and uncertainty—the 1910s and 20s—with our own contemporary moment of anxiety about film’s digital future.   In our studies, we’ll look at issues of film language, of spectatorship, of sound, and of film’s relationship to other arts.  Theorists will include Sergei Eisenstein, D.W. Griffith, Vachel Lindsay, Bela Balazs, Iris Barry, Dorothy Richardson, and many others.  Films may include The Last Laugh, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Les Vampires, Opus 1, Man with a Movie Camera, and The Passion of Joan of Arc.

French 8602 Comparative French and Italian Studies

Focuses on a comparative aspect of French and Italian studies. Content varies.
Prereq: Repeatable to a maximum of 12 cr hrs. Cross-listed in Italian.

  • Seminar: 30866 Meets: T 2:15-5:00 pm Hagerty Hall 206 Instructor: Dana Renga
    • ​Class Title: French and Italian Holocaust Cinema and Trauma Theory
      • ​This course explores representations of the Holocaust in French and Italian film and documentary, paying particular attention to how trauma is staged therein at national and individual levels. Films and documentaries centre on the Nazi occupation of Italy and France, the expulsion of French and Italian Jews to the concentration camps, and more broadly the concentration camp experience. We will look at, for example, documentaries that represent the bureaucratic side of evil, melodramas that stage love stories against the backdrop of exportation and imprisonment, and films where survival  is connected with sexual deviance. Readings, primarily in the field of trauma theory, engage with questions relating to vicarious trauma, individual and national memory and trauma, witnessing, the creation of trauma narratives, the gendering of blame, perpetrator trauma, the homo sacer, and narrative fetishism, melodramatic memory, and mourning. Course conducted in English.

Italian 8602 Comparative French and Italian Studies

Focuses on a comparative aspect of French and Italian studies. Content varies.
Prereq: Repeatable to a maximum of 12 cr hrs. Cross-listed in French.

  • Seminar: 30847 Meets: T 2:15-5:00 pm Hagerty Hall 206 Instructor: Dana Renga
    • ​Class Title: French and Italian Holocaust Cinema and Trauma Theory
      • ​This course explores representations of the Holocaust in French and Italian film and documentary, paying particular attention to how trauma is staged therein at national and individual levels. Films and documentaries centre on the Nazi occupation of Italy and France, the expulsion of French and Italian Jews to the concentration camps, and more broadly the concentration camp experience. We will look at, for example, documentaries that represent the bureaucratic side of evil, melodramas that stage love stories against the backdrop of exportation and imprisonment, and films where survival  is connected with sexual deviance. Readings, primarily in the field of trauma theory, engage with questions relating to vicarious trauma, individual and national memory and trauma, witnessing, the creation of trauma narratives, the gendering of blame, perpetrator trauma, the homo sacer, and narrative fetishism, melodramatic memory, and mourning. Course conducted in English.

Spanish 7800 Latin American Film

Study of Latin American film focusing on historical periods, dominant genres, distinguished directors, and relation of film to larger social, cultural and political dynamics.
Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instrucotr. Not open to students with credit for 780.

  • Lecture: 31032 Meets: T 5:30-8:15 pm Hagerty Hall 255 Instructor: Abril Trigo

Courses Outside the Major and Minor of Interest for Film Studies Majors or Minors
***Not part of the basic Film Studies Major or Minor***

**Check "Course Descriptions" to verify enrollment permissions and prerequisites needed**

ACCAD 4101 Performance and Installation Technology

An overview of technologies useful for creating interactive installations and performance systems, using video projection, 3D graphics, environmental sensors and visual programming.
Prereq: Permission of instructor.

  • Lecture: 33795 Meets: T Th 12:45-2:05 pm Sullivant Hall 349A Instructor: Matthew Lewis

ACCAD 5002 Computer Animation: Form, Light, and Motion I

Overview of 3D computer animation components and stages of production.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for ArtsCol 749.

  • Lecture: 26301, 26302 Meets: T Th 9:35-10:55 am Sullivant Hall 349A Instructor: Stephen Conroy

ACCAD 5003 Computer Animation: Form, Light, and Motion II

Further exploration of 3D computer animation and stages of production.
Prereq: ACCAD 5002, or permission of instructor.

  • Lecture: 33276, 33277 Meets: T Th 11:10-12:30 pm Sullivant Hall 349A Instructor: Stephen Conroy

ACCAD 5141 Interactive Arts Media II

Intermediate studies in application of interactive media for the web.
Prereq: 5140 or equivalent. Not open to students with credit for ArtsCol 741.

  • Lecture: 26303, 26304 Meets: M W 5:30-6:50 pm Sullivant Hall 349A Instructor: Jeremy Patterson

Art 5501 Video Art I

Introduction to the creation and analysis of video artwork; including techniques of video capture, post production, manipulation and critique within the context of art.
Prereq: 2000, 2400, 2501, 25555, 200, 208, or 300.02, or History of Art 260, or Dance 357, or Theatre 100. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

  • Lecture: 15077, 15078 Meets: M W 6:55-9:40 pm Hopkins Hall 356 Instructor: Staff

Art 5551 Video Art II

Intermediate theory and practice of creating video artwork. Emphasis on personal expression and experimental approaches.
Prereq: 4001, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

  • Lecture: 15081, 15082 Meets: M W 3:55-6:40 pm Hopkings Hall 356 Instructor: Roger Beebe

Film Studies 4880 Screenwriting and the Business of Cinema

This course examines screenwriting as both a literary art form and a challenging profession.
Prereq: Theatre 5331 (636), or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 680.

  • Lecture: 18941 Meets: W F 9:35-10:55 am TBA Instructor: Andrew Rose

Film Studies 4890 Advanced Screenwriting

An intensive writing course in which each student completes a feature-length screenplay based on work previously completed in Film Studies 680 or Film Studies 4880.
Prereq: 4880 (680), and permission of director. Not open to students with credit for 690.

  • Seminar: 28098 Meets: M 3:00-5:45 pm University Hall 024 Instructor: Angus Fletcher

Film Studies 5194 Group Study: TV Writing and the Business of Television

Television writing from both a creative and business perspective. Students learn the various formats for TV-show scripts and pitches, and how they differ from feature film. Additionally, students will briefly study American television history. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs or 3 completions.
If you are interested, please contact the Film Studies office atfilmstudies@osu.edu
Prereq: Department consent.

  • Lecture: 28184 Meets: W F 11:10-12:30 pm TBA Instructor: Andrew Rose

Film Studies 5600 Pathways in Film Practice and Theory

Explorations of the rich interconnections between the understanding and the production of moving-image works. Students will be introduced to alternative modes of the moving image in the context of other modes of artistic expression and critical thought, with the aim of increasing intellectual breadth and production skills.
Prereq: 2271, or Grad standing; or permission of program.

  • Lecture: 32764, 32765 Meets: W 3:00-5:45 pm Hopkins Hall 356 Instructor: Roger Beebe
    • Class TitleFound Footage, Editing, and the Culture of Copyright
      • We live in a world where questions of copyright, once the arcane bailiwick of intellectual property lawyers, are now part of our everyday conversations. With the increasing reproducibility of digital media of all sorts, we are daily confronted with the gray areas of this legal landscape, making choices that are often unexamined. This course seeks both to shine a light on these issues, developing an articulate theory of media ecology in the contemporary world, and to make work that grows out of that examination, work based in the long history of appropriation in art. We will ground our inquiry in the major historical texts and movements that have been at the forefront of such art-making strategies, but we will attempt to push beyond them as we seek strategies specific to our moment.

Theatre 3351 Television Production I

Fundamentals of television broadcasting through lectures, labs and practicum involvement with OSU's student television station and media lab.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 300.

  • Lab: 24339 Meets: T Th 10:20-12:25 pm Drake Center 0022 Instructor: David Fisher

Theatre 3352 Television Production II

Intermediate level course providing students with in depth study of television broadcasting through lectures, labs, and practicum involvement with OSU's student television and media lab.
Prereq: 3351 (300).

  • Lab: 27551 Meets: T Th 2:20-3:40 pm Drake Center 0022 Instructor: David Fisher

Theatre 5321 Video Production I

Basic video production through research and project assignments. Basic camera, sound, lighting and editing techniques will be practiced in collaborative and individual settings.
Prereq: Permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 634.

  • Seminar: 24340, 24341 Meets: T Th 3:55-5:15 pm Drake Center 2060 Instructor: David Fisher

Theatre 5323 Video Production II

Exploration of intermediate video analysis and production through research and project assignments with camera, sound, lighting and editing techniques.
Prereq: 5322. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

  • Lab: 24312, 24313 Meets: T Th 11:30-1:35 pm Drake Center 2060 Instructor: Janet Parrott

Theatre 5331 Screenwriting

Exploration of creative script-writing for video/cinema; development of short or feature length scripts.
Prereq: Permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 636.

  • Seminar: 24342, 24343 Meets: T Th 3:55-5:15 pm Drake Center 2038 Instructor: Scott Spears
0