Spring 2019

Please check Buckeyelink and/or refer to a course's home department for any questions about course topics, instructors, or schedules. You can find instructor contact information on the department's homepage or using the people find search engine on my.osu.edu.

If you have questions about major or minor requirements please see the advising sheets linked on this page or contact an advisor to assist you.

Moving-Image Production courses / Film Studies Undergraduate Major and Minor courses / Screenwriting Focus courses / Production Focus courses / Graduate Courses 

Moving-Image Production Major

PDF icon MIP Advising Guide 2018.pdf

 

ACCAD 5102 - 0010 :  3D Computer Animation: Form, Light and Motion I

Overview of 3D computer animation components and stages of production.

Prereq: Not open to students with credit for ArtsCol 749.

 

Lecture: (combined sections)

  • TuTh 9:35AM-10:55AM / Sullivant Hall 349A / Steve Conroy (19519)
  • TuTh 9:35AM-10:55AM / Sullivant Hall 349A / Steve Conroy (19518)

 

 

ACCAD 5103 - 0010 :  3D Computer Animation: Form, Light and Motion II

Overview of 3D computer animation components and stages of production.

Prereq: Not open to students with credit for ArtsCol 749.

 

Lecture: (combined sections)

  • TuTh 11:10AM-12:30PM / Sullivant Hall 349A / Staff (19510)
  • TuTh 11:10AM-12:30PM / Sullivant Hall 349A / Staff (19511)

 

 

ART 4009 - 0010 :  Film/Video II: Experimental Strategies

This course is designed as an overview of a broad range of strategies and issues unique to the practice sometimes labeled "experimental film," avant-garde cinema," or "video art." Intermediate theory and practice of creating film/video artwork.  Emphasis on personal expression and experimental approaches.

Prereq: 3009, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 5551.

 

Lecture: (combined sections)

  • MoWe 6:55PM-9:40PM / TBA / Staff (31060)

Film Studies 5600 - Pathways in Film Practice and Theory: The Essay Film

Explorations of the rich interconnections between the understanding and the production of moving-image works. Students will be introduced to alternative modes of the moving image in the context of other modes of artistic expression and critical thought, with the aim of increasing intellectual breadth and production skills.
Prereq: 2271, or Grad standing; or permission of program.

Email - Roger Beebe.77 or Matt Swift.23 to ask about enrollment permission.

  • TuTh 3:15PM-6:40PM / Hayes 024 / Roger Beebe

Coure Topic: The Essay Film - Existing at the borderlands between documentary and experimental film, the essay film offers propositions and provocations or constellations of ideas rather than definitive statements, using forms that are more open and exploratory than in a traditional documentary.  This class—a hybrid of film theory and filmmaking—will explore the history and theory of the essay film as a foundation upon which to build your own creative projects.  Students will combine research-based documentary exploration with the poetics of experimental cinema to devise their own essay films on topics of their choosing, ranging from the personal to the political.

 

MVNGIMG 2202 - 0010 :  Filmmaking Foundation II

This course is second in a sequence to introduce moving image production as an artistic, cultural, and multi-modal practice. It focuses on the building blocks of film grammar and offers an introduction to fundamental concepts and tools needed to work in the moving image, grounded in critical and historical context. Students use project-based learning to work independently and collaboratively. Prereq: 2201.

Lecture:

  • Tu 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Gateway Film Center House 4 / Vera Brunner-Sung

Available Labs:

  • Mo 11:10PM – 1:55:15PM / Hagerty Hall 062 / Staff (33054)
  • Mo 11:10PM – 1:55:15PM / Hagerty Hall 050 / Staff (33055)
  • Mo 3:55PM – 6:40PM / Hagerty Hall 056 / Staff (28402)

 

 

THEATRE 5321 - 0010  : Film/Video Production I

Basics of film/video production through lectures, analysis, and projects. Camera, sound, lighting, and editing techniques are practiced in collaborative and individual settings. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 634.

Lecture: (combined sections)

  • TuTh 3:55PM - 5:15PM / Drake Center 2060 / David Fisher
  • TuTh 3:55PM - 5:15PM / Drake Center 2060 / David Fisher

 

 

THEATRE 5323 - 0010   Film/Video Production II

Intermediate film/video analysis and production through research and project assignments with camera, sound, lighting, and editing techniques. Prereq: 5321, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

Lecture: (combined sections)

  • TuTh 9:10AM - 11:15AM / Drake Center 2060 / Vera Brunner-Sung
  • TuTh 9:10AM - 11:15AM / Drake Center 2060 / Vera Brunner-Sung

 

THEATRE 5341 - 0010   Studies in Documentary

Exploration of the conceptual, aesthetic, critical, social, ethical, and practical issues in the practice of documentary and reality production of cinema and video works.

Prereq: Permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 777.

 

Lecture: (combined sections)

  • TuTh 12:45PM – 2:05PM / Drake Center 2060 / Janet Parrott
  • TuTh 12:45PM – 2:05PM / Drake Center 2060 / Janet Parrott

 

Film Studies Undergrad MJ/MN

PDF icon Film Studies Major Advising Sheet.pdf

PDF icon Film Studies Minor Advising Sheet.pdf

AFAMAST 4571 - 10 : Black Visual Culture and Popular Media

An examination of African Americans in visual culture and the theories of representation in popular media. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 571. GE VPA and diversity soc div in the US course.

  • WeFr 9:35AM – 10:55PM / Journalism Bldg 371 / Judson Jeffries
  • TuTh 12:45PM – 2:05PM / University Hall 038 / Kenneth Goings
  • WeFr 11:10AM – 12:30PM - 5:15PM / Journalism Bldg 371 / Staff

 

 

CHINESE 4405 - 0100 : China in Chinese Film

An overview of Chinese cinema, with a focus on how film represents issues of nationhood, national identity, and national trauma. Taught in English, no Chinese required. Prereq: English 1110 or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 505. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • Mo 2:15PM - 5:00PM / Derby Hall 214 / Kirk Denton
  • We 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Derby Hall 214  / Kirk Denton

 

COMPSTD 3607 - 0010 : Film and Literature as Narrative Art

Relationships between film and literature; emergence of cinematic art as a form of representation with emphasis on diverse cultural traditions. Prereq: English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 3607H (358H, 358). GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • WeFr 11:30AM - 12:25PM AND Mo 11:30AM - 1:35PM /Pomerene Hall 150 (WeFr) Baker Systems 180 (Mo) / Robert Livingston

 

ENGLISH 2263 - 0010 : Introduction to Film

This course will explore the formal and technological means through which stories are told on film, and how those techniques interact with the film industry and the viewers on which it relies.  Among other things, we'll consider cinematography, editing, mise-en-scene, sound, genre, distribution, exhibition venues, and the star system.  Throughout, our emphasis will be on bringing out and building upon the skills as a viewer that you've already developed over two decades or more of watching.

LECTURE:

  • TuTh 2:20PM / Gateway Film Center House 1 / Fredrick Aldama

RECITATIONS:

  • Fr 12:40PM - 1:35PM / McPherson 1046 / Staff
  • Fr 12:40PM - 1:35PM / Hayes 025 / Staff
  • Fr 1:50PM - 2:45PM / Mendenhall Lab 175 / Staff
  • Fr 1:50PM - 2:45PM / Scott lab N050 / Staff

 

ENGLISH 3378 - 0010 : Special Topics in Film and Literature

This course can satisfy various requirements: an upper-level (4000-level) or lower-level (3000-level) course for the English Major and Minor; a course for the Film Studies Minor; a course for the Popular Culture minor; a film course for the Pre-Education Major; and a Cultures and Ideas course for GE credit.

  • We Fr 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Page Hall 010 / Staff

 

ENGLISH 4578 - 0020 : Special Topics in Film

Examination of particular topics, themes, genres, or movements in cinema; topics may include particular directors (Orson Welles), periods (The Sixties), genres (horror).

Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 cr hrs of English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. 5 qtr cr hrs in 367 or 3 cr hrs in 2367 in any subject is acceptable towards the 6 cr hrs. Not open to students with 15 qtr cr hrs for 578 or 9 sem cr hrs for 4578 or 4578H. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

  • WeFr 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Denney Hall 206 / Jared Gardner

 

Course Topic: Hollywood in the Seventies

This course will explore one of the most interesting periods in American film industry, from the New Hollywood maverick directors who reigned supreme at the start of the decade to the rise of the blockbuster at decade's end. We will explore dominant themes during this period - such as paranoia and conspiracy - alongside the emergence of underground and fringe cinema.

 

ENGLISH 4578 - 0030 : Special Topics in Film

Examination of particular topics, themes, genres, or movements in cinema; topics may include particular directors (Orson Welles), periods (The Sixties), genres (horror).

Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 cr hrs of English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. 5 qtr cr hrs in 367 or 3 cr hrs in 2367 in any subject is acceptable towards the 6 cr hrs. Not open to students with 15 qtr cr hrs for 578 or 9 sem cr hrs for 4578 or 4578H. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

  • TuTh 12:45PM – 2:05PM / Campbell 213 / Ryan Friedman

 

Course Topic: Film and American Society after World War II

This course examines the history of the American cinema in the years immediately following the Second World War, focusing on the ways in which Hollywood movies reflected, responded to, and inflected the major social issues of the period. We will view and discuss classic films from a variety of genres, contextualizing them by reading both primary sources (like government documents and period magazine articles) and the work of contemporary film historians. Most weeks will pair a specific film with a significant social development from the period (for instance, Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House with economic "reconversion," The Best Years of Our Lives with the so-called "veterans problem," and Blackboard Jungle with the emergence of "juvenile delinquency"). We will also examine the development of film technology and style during the 1940s and 50s, thinking about phenomena like the rise of Technicolor and widescreen formats and the emergence of film noir.

 

FILMSTD 2271 - 10 : Introduction to Film Studies for Majors

An introduction to the field of Film Studies based on a survey of the major theories of film analysis, specifically geared for incoming majors. Prereq: English 2263 (263), or HistArt 2901 (260). Not open to students with credit for 2270 (270). GE VPA course.

  • We Fr 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Hagerty Hall 062 / Paige Piper

 

FILMSTD 4650 - 10 : Studies in Regional Cinema

An upper-level course on aspects of film history geared toward film studies majors.  Prereq: 2270 or 2271, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

Course topic - POP-ART: LATIN AMERICAN CINEMAS AND THE GLOBAL MARKETPLACE

Latin American cinemas have long drawn on local cultural traditions while also dialoguing with cinematic trends in other parts of the world.  From El tren fantasma (Mexico, Gabriel Garcia Moreno, 1927) to O que e isso, companeiro (Brazil, Bruno Barreto, 1997) and Desierto (Mexico, Jonas Cuaron, 2015), films from Mexico, Brazil and other countries have targeted domestic audiences and, at the same time, tried to appeal to spectators located elsewhere. “Pop-Art” will explore this flow of aesthetic tendencies between Latin America, Europe, and the United States and also examine the industrial structures and global economic conditions that shape how Latin American films are produced and circulated in different marketplaces.

To examine these dynamics, we will compare present-day genre films that often fare well in theaters within particular countries with “art films” that tend to win recognition on the festival circuit within and outside the region.  We will spend part of the semester analyzing Latin American horror films (Somos lo que hay / We Are What We Are; Juan de los Muertos / Juan of the Dead), romantic comedies (Cansada de besar sapos / Tired of Kissing Frogs; Que pena tu vida / F#ck my Life), and/or road films (Guantanamera; Por la libre / Dust to Dust; Cinema, Aspirinas e Urubus / Cinema, Aspirin and Vultures) –discussing why those films might have been commercially successful at home and how they dialogue with genre norms.  We will spend the other part of the term analyzing art- or festival films that have won worldwide recognition for directors such as Lucrecia Martel, Lisandro Alonso, Carlos Reygadas, and Michel Franco, who have not tended to achieve commercial success at home.  In this section of the course, we will explore how festivals shape aesthetic tastes and contribute to understandings of “national cinemas.” 

  • Tu Th 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Hagerty Hall 062 / Laura Podalsky

 

FILMSTD 4895 - 10 : Advanced Seminar: Topics in Film Studies

Special Topic: Documentary and its limits

 

In this class, we will explore documentary film and its limits - films that engage in various types of historical and non-fictional discourse, deploy documentary techniques/style within fictional narratives, etc. In order to make this a true “capstone” experience, the class will serve as the editorial board for a special issue of the journal Film Matters dedicated to documentary. Students will learn about peer review, and other editorial processes. Papers written for the class will all also be considered for inclusion in the issue.

 

  • TuTh 9:35 – 10:55AM / Hagerty Hall 050 /Maggie Flinn

 

FRENCH 5701 - 10 : Topics in French and Francophone Cinema

Study of the history and aesthetics of French cinema. Topics vary.

Prereq: For undergraduates - 3101 (401) plus one additional 3000- or 4000-level (400-level) course taught in French. For graduate students - Permission of the Graduate Advisor. Not open to students with credit for 670. FL Admis Cond course.

  • TuTh 12:45PM – 2:05PM / Psychology Bldg 014 / Margaret Flinn

 

GERMAN 3351 - 010 : Democracy, Fascism and German Culture

Explore the history of the Weimar Republic and of Nazi Germany through the literature, film, music, visual arts and design produced between 1918 and 1945. We will be uncovering the roots of fascism and looking also at its echoes in works created in post-Nazi Germany. What can the cultural products tell us that the history books can’t? Were the 1920s really the golden age of German cinema? How did the arts change after the Nazis came to power in 1933? Why did the Nazis burn books and call certain artistic styles degenerate?

Taught in English. Meets Film Studies' Pre-1950s requirement. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course.

  • TuTh 2:20PM - 3:40PM / McPherson Lab 2015 / John Davidson

 

HISTART 2901 - 0001 : Introduction to World Cinema

Chronological survey of the most influential and recognized film artists and film movements of the world.  Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 260. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • TuTh 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Knowlton Hall 250 / Staff (18979)
  • Distance Learning /Online / Kristina Paulsen (28304)

 

HISTART 3901 - 0010 : World Cinema Today

An introduction to the art of international cinema today, including its forms and varied content. Prereq: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 350. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • TuTh 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Hagerty Hall 180 / Erica Levin

 

HISTART 5905 - 0010   Avant-Garde Cinema

A survey of significant historical contributions to avant-garde cinema. Prereq: Jr standing. Not open to students with credit for 650.

Lecture: (combined sections)

  • WeFr 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Jennings Hall 140 / Erica Levin
  • WeFr 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Jennings Hall 140 / Erica Levin

 

ITALIAN 2055 - 10   Mafia Movies

Examines Italian and American mafia movies made from 1905 to the present day and traces the history of the Italian and Italian American Mafias.  Taught in English. GE VPA course.

  • WeFr 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Gateway Film Center House 1 / Dana Renga

 

Course Screening List: The Godfather, The Godfather Part II, Mean Streets, Goodfellas, The Sopranos, Gomorrah, Gomorrah: The Series, Suburra: The Series, The Leopard, The Black Hand

Angela, Romanzo criminale

 

Course Twitter site:

OSU Italian Film

@OSUItalianFilm

 

 

MUSIC 3344 - 020 : Film Music

A study of how music has functioned in film across its century-long history, as produced in Hollywood and in other countries, and by filmmakers independent of the studio system. Prereq: English 1110 or 1111. GE VPA course.

  • TuTh 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Weigel Hall 177 / Arved Ashby

 

Viewing-listening list:

Gone with the Wind, Birth of a Nation, The Jazz Singer, King Kong, Snow White & the Seven Dwarfs, Bride of Frankenstein, Adventures of Robin Hood, Wuthering Heights, Alexander Nevsky, Citizen Kane, Casablanca, Spellbound, Sunset Blvd., On the Waterfront, Best Years of Our Lives, Streetcar Named Desire, High Noon, Singin' in the Rain, Psycho, To Kill a Mockingbird, The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly, Ben Hur,  Lawrence of Arabia, The Godfather, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Taxi Driver, Blade Runner, Amadeus, The Empire Strikes Back, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Die Hard, Batman, Last of the Mohicans, The Last Emperor, Cinema Paradiso, Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon, Stranger than Paradise, Magnolia, Lost in Translation, Easy Rider, Titanic, The Matrix, Run Lola Run, Django Unchained, Blue Velvet, Kill Bill 2, Sometimes Happy Sometimes Sad, Fallen Angels, Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist, The Red Violin, The Hours, Harry Potter & the Sorcerer’s Stone

 

RUSSIAN 3460 - 0010 : Modern Russian Experience through Film

Exploration of some of the most revealing hopes and disappointments of Russian people presented in internationally acclaimed Russian films. Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 360. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • TuTh 9:35AM – 10:55PM / Campbell Hall 251 / Staff
  • WeFr 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Derby Hall 080 / Staff

 

SLAVIC 3310 - 0010   Science Fiction: East vs. West

Slavic, American, and British sci-fi on page and screen as reflection of major cultural concerns: progress, utopia, human perfectibility, limits of science and knowledge, gender, identity. Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 3320 or WGSSt 3310. GE VPA and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in WGSSt.

  • TuTh 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Ramseyer Hall 009 / Staff

 

SLAVIC 3360 - 0010   Screening Minorities: Representations of the Other in Slavic Film

Film representations of ethnic and religious others in East European cinema.  Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 360. GE VPA course.

  • WeFr 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Hagerty Hall 259 / Staff

 

SPANISH 4581 - 1   Spanish Film

Study of Spanish film; special attention is paid to the relationship between film and the society in which it is produced. Prereq: A grade of C- or above in 3450 (450) or 3450H (450H). Not open to students with credit for 581. FL Admis Cond course.

  • MoWe 5:30PM – 6:50PM / Hagerty Hall 062 / Ignasi Gozalo Salellas

 

WGSST 3317 - 0010   Hollywood, Women, and Film

A critical survey of the rep. of women in Hollywood cinema, examples drawn from the 1930's to present. Learn how film has functioned in its representation of women and how and why women film makers have created alternative visions of women in film. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 317. GE VPA course.

  • TuTh 3:55PM - 5:15PM / Journalism Bldg 300 / Linda Mizejewski, Meghan Jackson

 

Screenwriting

PDF icon Screenwriting Minor Advising Sheet.pdf

 

THEATRE 5331 - 0010 : Screenwriting

Exploration of creative script-writing for video/cinema; development of short or feature length scripts. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 636.

  • We Fr 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Drake Center 2038 / Scott Spears (combined section class)
  • We Fr 3:55PM - 5:15PM / Drake Center 2038 / Scott Spears (combined section class)

 

FILMSTD 4880 - 10   Screenwriting and the Business of Cinema

This course examines screenwriting as both a literary art form and a challenging profession.  Each student will take an original premise for a movie and develop it into a logline, a treatment, a step outline, and ultimately, a polished first act of a feature-length screenplay. In addition, this class will teach the essentials necessary to succeed in the highly competitive world of professional screenwriting, discussing types of deals available to a scriptwriter, Writers Guild rules and regulations, how to pitch a story, ways to attain literary representation and more.  Prereq: Theatre 5331 (636), or permission of instructor. Not open to credit to students with credit for 680.

  • We Fr 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Denney Hall 207 / Andrew Rose

 

FILMSTD 4881 - 10   Screenwriting and the Business of Television

This course examines television writing from both a creative and business perspective. Each student will individually pitch, and then write the show's bible, outline, and pilot. Students learn about teleplay structure, as well as ways to develop intriguing characters, realistic dialogue, and engaging episodes. In small groups students develop, write, and read others' work collectively. Prereq: Theatre 5331 or permission of instructor. Not available to students with credit for 5194 Sp15.

  • We Fr 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Denney Hall 207 / Andrew Rose

 

FILMSTD 4890 - 20   Advanced Screenwriting

An intensive writing course in which each student completes a feature-length screenplay based on work previously completed in Film Studies 680 or Film Studies 4880. Prereq:4880 (680), and permission of director. Not open to students with credit for 690.

  • Mo 12:40PM - 3:25PM / Denney Hall 207 / Angus Fletcher

 

Focus Area and Production Electives

Coming Soon

 

Graduate Courses

ENGLISH 7878.01 - 0010   Seminar in Film & Media Studies

An intensive study of selected issues, themes, and forms in Film & Media Studies. Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with 10 qtr cr hrs for 878 or 6 sem cr hrs for 7878.01 or 7878.02. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

  • Th 1:50PM - 4:50PM / Denney Hall 435 / Sean O’Sullivan

 

ENGLISH 7878.02 - 0020   Seminar in Film & Media Studies

An intensive study of selected issues, themes, and forms in Film & Media Studies. Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with 10 qtr cr hrs for 878 or 6 sem cr hrs for 7878.01 or 7878.02. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs. This course is graded S/U.

  • Th 1:50PM - 4:50PM / Denney Hall 435 / Sean O’Sullivan

 

FILMSTD 7001 - 10   Advanced Theory Seminar: Methods and Applications

A theory and methods seminar which focuses on one scholarly approach to cinema (auteurism, formalism, historicism, feminism, etc). Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

  • Th 1:00PM - 4:00PM / Denney Hall 435 / Sean O'Sullivan

Course Topic - "Authorship and Its Discontents"

The question of authorship has been both the lifeblood and the bane of film studies since its birth as a discipline.  The primacy of the cult of the director has been variously challenged by shifting authorial power to other agents--the studio, the performer, and (in television) the writer--or by casting doubt on the validity of a literary model of creative ownership, within a profoundly collaborative medium.  This seminar will engage the debates over authorship in cinema and TV, considering battles about design, category, and contribution across a range of eras, genres, and contexts.  Our recurrent concerns will be: when do we care about authorship, and why does it matter?  Primary materials may include: CasablancaCamerapersonExit Through the Gift ShopThe Beaches of AgnesTwelve Years a Slave2046Close-UpFamily PlotIntoleranceWonder WomanI Love Lucy, and Louie.

 

FRENCH 5701 - 10 : Topics in French and Francophone Cinema

Study of the history and aesthetics of French cinema. Topics vary.

Prereq: For undergraduates - 3101 (401) plus one additional 3000- or 4000-level (400-level) course taught in French. For graduate students - Permission of the Graduate Advisor. Not open to students with credit for 670. FL Admis Cond course.

  • TuTh 12:45PM – 2:05PM / Psychology Bldg 014 / Margaret Flinn

Course Topic: This course focuses on films from the 1960s-present that come from many different parts of the French-speaking world (including the Hexagon). Such films emerge from various de-, post/, and neo-colonial relationships between French-speaking European nations and the rest of the French speaking world. Working comparatively, then, we will consider how film can be used to address the following types of questions: How do these bodies move through space? How are their identities shaped and represented? How does gender, as an axis of identity, interact with individuals’ relationships to the socio-cultural context in which they live? In newly independent nations, are some bodies more independent that others? Who embodies history for the nation? Is the gendering of bodies a constraining or liberating process?

The language of instruction of this course is French, and all films have French dialogue or are subtitled in French. A background in film studies is NOT required to take this class (although experience in some sort of visual analysis is of course helpful). Undergraduate pre-requisite is French 3101 plus at least one additional 3000- or 4000-level course.

Graduate students from other departments who whose research agenda is would be well suited to this material but are uncertain as to whether their French skills are adequate for discussion or reading are encouraged to consult with the professor to see what types of accommodations may be made.

 

ITALIAN 8243 -  Studies in Italian Cinema

 

  • We 2:20PM - 5:00PM / Hagerty Hall 206 / Luca Peretti

Course Topic: Italian Transnational Cinema - Concepts of national cinema are frequently deployed to organize films. Alongside paintings, books, or plays, we group films according to their national provenance. In this course, we will question this idea at its root, suggesting that a transnational approach might be more fruitful to the study of film. As the empirical categorization that encompass films produced, sponsored or filmed by people of Italian nationalities, Italian cinema is no exception. In this seminar we will study co-productions, films made by non-nationals in Italy and Italians abroad, travel films, colonial and post-colonial filmic texts, films on emigrant communities or those that depict Italian workers abroad, and international co-productions that question whether an “Italian cinema” even exists. We will look at the films themselves, at their production history, and also their reception and distribution patterns, in film theaters and in places as varied as the Pentagon and business fairs. Primary material will include The Battle of Algiers, We the Living, Terminal Station/Indiscretion of an American Wife, the films produced abroad by the masters of Italian cinema including Michelangelo Antonioni, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Tinto Brass, and Bernardo Bertolucci, Once upon a Time in America, Roberto Rossellini’s India, Holocaust films like Seven Beauties and The Night Porter, Mondo movies, and the films shot in English by a new generation of Italian directors – including  Call me by your name. The goals of this seminar are twofold: on the one hand, we will reimagine the history of Italian cinema as a transnational enterprise; on the other hand, the seminar will convey a general methodology that can be employed for the study of other cinematic traditions.

HISTART 5905 - 0010   Avant-Garde Cinema

A survey of significant historical contributions to avant-garde cinema. Prereq: Jr standing. Not open to students with credit for 650.

Lecture: (combined sections)

  • WeFr 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Jennings Hall 140 / Erica Levin
  • WeFr 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Jennings Hall 140 / Erica Levin

 

SLAVIC - 6457   Film, Ideology, and Viewers

By analyzing case studies of Russian, East European, and U.S. films, the course explores the complex dynamics between ideology, propaganda, and the ways films “tap into the political unconscious” (to evoke Fredric Jameson) of viewers.  The critical investigation centers on the ways cinematic constructions and their respective audiences are intertwined with the creation of national(ist) discourses. With the aid of audience studies and reception theory, the course examines film (and media) reception and the ideological factors which impact it.

  • We 1:00PM – 4:00PM / Hagerty Hall 160/ Yana Hashamova

 

 

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