Spring 2020

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Please check Buckeyelink and/or refer to a course's home department for any questions about course topics, instructors, or schedules. You can find instructor contact information on the department's homepage or using the people find search engine on my.osu.edu.

If you have questions about major or minor requirements please see the advising sheets linked on this page or contact an advisor to assist you.

Moving-Image Production courses / Film Studies Undergraduate Major and Minor courses / Screenwriting Focus courses / Production Focus courses / Graduate Courses 

Moving-Image Production Major

 

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ACCAD 5001 - 0010 :  Motion Studies through Hand-Drawn Animation

The principles of animation as demonstrated through hand-drawn animation. The work produced serves as a tool for comprehending the underlying process of any animation technique.

Course Topic:  The course provides an overview of techniques ranging from 2D animation, to stop motion and pixilation as it introduces animation as a tool for filmmakers to employ. Students will learn the principles of animation through developing and creating various animation projects independently and collaboratively.

Prereq: Not open to students with credit for ArtsCol 683.

Lecture: (combined sections)

  • TuTh 1:00PM-2:20PM / Denney Hall 060 / Staff (160216)

 

ACCAD 5002 - 0010 :  3D Computer Animation: Form, Light and Motion I

Overview of 3D computer animation components and stages of production.

Prereq: Not open to students with credit for ArtsCol 749.

Lecture: (combined sections)

  • WeFr 9:35AM-11:25AM / Sullivant Hall 349A / Kyoung Swearingen (19529)
  • WeFr 9:35AM-11:25AM / Sullivant Hall 349A / Kyoung Swearingen (19528)

 

ACCAD 5003 - 0010 :  3D Computer Animation: Form, Light and Motion II

Further exploration of 3D computer animation and stages of production.

Prereq: 5002, or permission of instructor.

Lecture: (combined sections)

  • TuTh 9:35AM-10:55AM / Sullivant Hall 349A / Stephen Conroy (19522)
  • TuTh 9:35AM-10:55AM / Sullivant Hall 349A / Stephen Conroy (19523)

 

ART 2000 - 0010 :  Encountering Contemporary Art

Readings, lectures, discussions and field trips will introduce students to a diverse range of ideas, processes and contexts shaping the experience of visual art today.

Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 162 or 200..

Lecture: (combined sections)

  • TuTh 3:55PM-5:15PM / Jennings Hall 155 / Staff (15982)

 

ART 3555 - 0020   Introduction to Digital Photography and Contemporary Issues

Students will learn fundamental digital camera techniques and explore contemporary and historical issues in photography including the relationships between technique, concept, and aesthetics as well as the relationship between images, identity formation, and larger social structures.

Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 2555.

GE VPA course.

Available Labs:

  • TuTh 8:10AM – 10:55AM / Hopkins 262 / Staff
  • MoWeFr 10:05am – 11:55AM / Hopkins 262 / Staff
  • TuTh 11:10AM –  1:55AM / Hopkins 262 / Staff
  • MoWeFr 12:05PM – 1:55PM / Hopkins 262 / Staff
  • MoWeFr 2:05PM – 3:55PM / Hopkins 262 / Staff
  • TuTh 6:55PM – 9:40PM / Hopkins 262 / Staff
  • MoWeFr 4:05PM – 5:55PM / Hopkins 262 / Staff
  • MoWe 6:05PM – 8:45PM / Hopkins 262 / Staff

 

ART 4009 - 0010 :  Film/Video II: Experimental Strategies

This course is designed as an overview of a broad range of strategies and issues unique to the practice sometimes labeled "experimental film," avant-garde cinema," or "video art." Intermediate theory and practice of creating film/video artwork. Emphasis on personal expression and experimental approaches.
Prereq: 3009 or MvngImg 2201 or 2202, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 5551.

  • TuTh 6:55PM – 9:40PM / Hopkins 354/ Staff (27602)

 

ART 5019 - 0010 :  Film/Video IV: Topics in Theories and Strategies

A variable-topics film or video production course focused on a conceptual issue or set of issues related to contemporary film and video practice. May focus specifically on film and video in the context of other arts or on issues with relevance outside of the narrowly defined fields of experimental film or video art.

Prereq: 3009 and 4009 or MvngImg 2201 or 2202, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

  • TuTh 6:55PM – 9:40PM / Hopkins 156/ Dani Restack (162937)

Special Topic: Experiment: Fact to Fiction and Back Or Video Diary as Form & Fantasy

One 7-minute experimental video will be made over the course of the semester. We will work with the banal and the fantastical. We will move from explicit to implicit ways of communicating the things that concern you. Be prepared to experiment with cardboard, paint, strangers and sound.

We begin with guided meditation free write sessions. What do you have on your mind that feels urgent? What do you care about? After the free write, turn this into a dialogue between 3 people. Find nuanced ways to say things that expose the complexity of your idea. Next, write a voiceover.

Guided meditation to find a MOMENT in your current life that can be documented. You can go home for this if need be. This “documentary” footage is a collection of shots that won’t be carefully edited.

Next step is to reenact that MOMENT. This must be with “actors” and the space/location has to be invented with cardboard, paint, thrift store objects and costume to mimic the “documentary” shots. This will become a 3-minute edited video.

We will share this work then have a group Brainstorming Session to infuse this idea with fiction.

 

MVNGIMG 2202 - 0010 :  Filmmaking Foundation II

This course is second in a sequence to introduce moving image production as an artistic, cultural, and multi-modal practice. It focuses on the building blocks of film grammar and offers an introduction to fundamental concepts and tools needed to work in the moving image, grounded in critical and historical context. Students use project-based learning to work independently and collaboratively.

Prereq: MVNGIMG 2201.

Lecture:

  • Tu 12:45PM – 2:05PM /Gateway Film Center House 2/ Vera Brunner - Sung

Available Labs:

  • We 12:45PM – 3:25PM / (Crit.) Hagerty Hall 062 (Editing) Hagerty Hall 0186 / Staff (28492)
  • We 3:40PM – 6:20PM / (Crit.) Hagerty Hall 062 (Editing) Hagerty Hall 0186 / Staff (27437)
  • We 6:35PM – 9:15PM / (Crit.) Hagerty Hall 062 (Editing) Hagerty Hall 0186 / Staff (27438)

 

MVNGIMG 4200 - Cinema Today

Students to attend a specific set of new films, documentaries, and classics at world-class venues such as the Wexner Center of the Arts and when available, any associated visiting filmmakers' discussions of their work. To synthesize these viewings, students will submit response writings that apply specific elements of film language to answer questions about the films.

Repeatable to a maximum of 3 cr hours.

Prereq: MIP Majors Only

Lecture:

  • Th 6:50PM – 9:40PM /TBA/ Joshua Truett (course meets occasionally on Thursday nights)

 

THEATRE 5323 - 0010   Film/Video Production II

Intermediate film/video analysis and production through research and project assignments with camera, sound, lighting, and editing techniques.

Prereq: 5321, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

Lecture: (combined sections)

  • TuTh 9:10AM - 11:15AM / Drake Center 2060 / Vera Brunner-Sung
  • TuTh 9:10AM - 11:15AM / Drake Center 2060 / Vera Brunner-Sung

 

THEATRE 5899 - 0010   Workshops – Documentary 2

Intensive study of a problem common to the participants for the purpose of developing principles and practices relating to it.

Prereq: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 36 cr hrs or 4 completions.

Lecture: (combined sections)

  • WeFr 11:30AM / Drake Center 2060 / Michael Kaplan

 

Film Studies Undergrad MJ/MN

PDF iconFilm Studies Major Advising Sheet.pdf

 

CHINESE 4405 - 0100 : China in Chinese Film

An overview of Chinese cinema, with a focus on how film represents issues of nationhood, national identity, and national trauma. Taught in English, no Chinese required. Prereq: English 1110 or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 505. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • Mo 2:15PM - 5:00PM / Derby Hall 214 / Kirk Denton
  • We 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Derby Hall 214  / Kirk Denton

 

COMPSTD 3607 - 0010 : Film and Literature as Narrative Art

Relationships between film and literature; emergence of cinematic art as a form of representation with emphasis on diverse cultural traditions. Prereq: English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 3607H (358H, 358). GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • WeFr 11:30AM - 12:25PM AND Mo 11:30AM - 1:35PM /Pomerene Hall 150 (WeFr) Baker Systems 180 (Mo) / Robert Livingston

 

ENGLISH 2263 - 0010 : Introduction to Film

This course will explore the formal and technological means through which stories are told on film, and how those techniques interact with the film industry and the viewers on which it relies.  Among other things, we'll consider cinematography, editing, mise-en-scene, sound, genre, distribution, exhibition venues, and the star system.  Throughout, our emphasis will be on bringing out and building upon the skills as a viewer that you've already developed over two decades or more of watching.

LECTURE:

  • TuTh 2:20PM / Gateway Film Center House 1 / Sean O’Sulivan

RECITATIONS:

  • Fr 12:40PM - 1:35PM / Mendenhall Lab 129 / Staff
  • Fr 12:40PM - 1:35PM / Mendenhall Lab 131 / Staff
  • Fr 1:50PM - 2:45PM / Hagerty Hall 062 / Staff
  • Fr 1:50PM - 2:45PM / Mendenhall Lab 173 / Staff

 

ENGLISH 3378 - 0010 : Special Topics in Film and Literature

This course can satisfy various requirements: an upper-level (4000-level) or lower-level (3000-level) course for the English Major and Minor; a course for the Film Studies Minor; a course for the Popular Culture minor; a film course for the Pre-Education Major; and a Cultures and Ideas course for GE credit.

  • TuTh 11:10AM – 12:30PM / Denney Hall 250 / Alan Farmer

 

ENGLISH 4578 - 0010 : Special Topics in Film (Topic to be Announced)

Examination of particular topics, themes, genres, or movements in cinema; topics may include particular directors (Orson Welles), periods (The Sixties), genres (horror).

Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 cr hrs of English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. 5 qtr cr hrs in 367 or 3 cr hrs in 2367 in any subject is acceptable towards the 6 cr hrs. Not open to students with 15 qtr cr hrs for 578 or 9 sem cr hrs for 4578 or 4578H. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

  • We Fr 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Denney Hall 206 / Jane Chen

 

ENGLISH 4578 - 0020 : Special Topics in Film (Topic to be Announced)

Examination of particular topics, themes, genres, or movements in cinema; topics may include particular directors (Orson Welles), periods (The Sixties), genres (horror).

Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 cr hrs of English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. 5 qtr cr hrs in 367 or 3 cr hrs in 2367 in any subject is acceptable towards the 6 cr hrs. Not open to students with 15 qtr cr hrs for 578 or 9 sem cr hrs for 4578 or 4578H. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

  • TuTh 11:10AM – 12:30PM / Denney Hall 209 / Sean O’Sullivan

 

FILMSTD 2271 - 10 : Introduction to Film Studies for Majors

An introduction to the field of Film Studies based on a survey of the major theories of film analysis, specifically geared for incoming majors. Prereq: English 2263 (263), or HistArt 2901 (260). Not open to students with credit for 2270 (270). GE VPA course.

  • WeFr 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Hagerty Hall 062 / Ryan Friedman

 

FILMSTD 4895 - 10 : Advanced Seminar: Topics in Film Studies

Selected problems (themes, movements, theories, genres, styles, etc.) in film studies; topics vary per semester.

Prereq: Enrollment in FilmStd major, and Sr standing, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs.

  • TuTh 9:35 – 10:55AM / Hagerty Hall 050 /Carl Laamanen

 

Course Topic: Digital Cinema and Embodied Spectators

Today, the vast majority of movies we watch are shot, edited, and screened digitally, and advances in technology allow us to watch movies whenever and wherever we want on a variety of devices and screens. Have we, as embodied spectators, lost anything in this transition to digital film? This course will explore the intersections between our bodies, spectatorship, and digital technologies, as we address current issues in film studies brought on by the shift to digital film. We will read classical and contemporary film theory and pay close attention to our viewing environments and technologies as we watch film at local theaters, in class, and at home. Our personal viewing experiences will guide us as we consider digital cinema and what it means for the future of film studies, spectators, and the cinema.

 

FRENCH 2801 - 10 : Classics of French Cinema

Introduction to the study of the cinema and to French film classics. Students will explore cinema as an art form, the social and cultural history of France as it relates to the cinema, and the qualities that make individual films cinematic masterpieces. Taught in English. GE VPA course

  • WeFr 9:35AM – 10:55AM / Psychology Bldg 014 / Margaret Flinn

 

This course functions as an introduction to the study of French cinema with the main focus on the “classic” period, the 1930s-1960s, that is, from early sound cinema through the French New Wave. The films we will study were either major popular success, or are critically celebrated films with a significant impact on the history of world cinema, or both. Mini-lecture and readings furnish both socio-cultural and film historical context and give examples of various approaches to the study of cinema. Students will be introduced to critical vocabulary of formal and technical analysis, and will develop skills in analysis and argumentation based on such analysis through class discussion and writing assignments. A background in film studies or French cultural history (literature, art history, language, etc.) is of course helpful, but is not presumed—we will do exercises in basic shot identification and formal analysis in the beginning weeks of the semester, and cultural historical context will be introduced in lecture or readings as it is relevant to interpretation.

 

GERMAN 3351 - 010 : Democracy, Fascism and German Culture

Explore the history of the Weimar Republic and of Nazi Germany through the literature, film, music, visual arts and design produced between 1918 and 1945. We will be uncovering the roots of fascism and looking also at its echoes in works created in post-Nazi Germany. What can the cultural products tell us that the history books can’t? Were the 1920s really the golden age of German cinema? How did the arts change after the Nazis came to power in 1933? Why did the Nazis burn books and call certain artistic styles degenerate?

Taught in English. Meets Film Studies' Pre-1950s requirement. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course.

  • TuTh 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Journalism Bldg 371 / John Davidson

 

HISTART 2901 - 0001 : Introduction to World Cinema

Chronological survey of the most influential and recognized film artists and film movements of the world.  Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 260. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • TuTh 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Knowlton Hall 250 / Staff (19013)
  • MoWe 5:30PM – 6:50PM / Journalism Bldg / Staff (19014)
  • Distance Learning /Online / Staff (27391)

 

HISTART 3901 - 0010 : World Cinema Today

An introduction to the art of international cinema today, including its forms and varied content. Prereq: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 350. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • TuTh 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Hitchcock Hall 324 / Mark Svede
  • TuTh 5:30 – 6:50PM / Journalism Bldg 270 / Mark Svede

 

HISTART 5905 - 0010   Avant-Garde Cinema

A survey of significant historical contributions to avant-garde cinema. Prereq: Jr standing. Not open to students with credit for 650.

Lecture: (combined sections)

  • WeFr 3:55PM – 5:15PM / Pomerene Hall 250 / Erica Levin
  • WeFr 3:55PM – 5:15PM / Pomerene Hall 250 / Erica Levin

 

ITALIAN 2055 - 10   Mafia Movies

Examines Italian and American mafia movies made from 1905 to the present day and traces the history of the Italian and Italian American Mafias.  Taught in English. GE VPA course.

  • WeFr 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Gateway Film Center House 1 / Dana Renga

 

Course Screening List: The Godfather, The Godfather Part II, Mean Streets, Goodfellas, The Sopranos, Gomorrah, Gomorrah: The Series, Suburra: The Series, The Leopard, The Black Hand

Angela, Romanzo criminale

Course Twitter site:

OSU Italian Film

@OSUItalianFilm

 

RUSSIAN 3460 - 0010 : Modern Russian Experience through Film

Exploration of some of the most revealing hopes and disappointments of Russian people presented in internationally acclaimed Russian films. Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 360. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

  • TuTh 11:10AM – 12:30PM / Mendenhall 173 / Helena Goscilo
  • WeFr 11:10AM – 12:30PM / Hayes Hall 025 / Staff

 

SLAVIC 3310 - 0010   Science Fiction: East vs. West

Slavic, American, and British sci-fi on page and screen as reflection of major cultural concerns: progress, utopia, human perfectibility, limits of science and knowledge, gender, identity. Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 3320 or WGSSt 3310. GE VPA and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in WGSSt.

  • TuTh 12:45PM - 2:05PM / Page Hall 020 / Helena Goscilo

 

SLAVIC 3360 - 0010   Screening Minorities: Representations of the Other in Slavic Film

Film representations of ethnic and religious others in East European cinema.  Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 360. GE VPA course.

  • WeFr 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Enarson Classroom Bldg 322 / Izolda Wolski-Moskoff

 

Spanish 4580 Latin American Film

Study of Latin American film; special attention is paid to the relationship between film and the society in which it is produced.

Prereq: A grade of C- or above in 3450 (450) or 3450H (450H). Not open to students with credit for 580. FL Admis Cond course.

  • WeFr 9:35AM – 10:55AM / Hagerty Hall 046 / Laura Podalsky

 

WGSST 2317 - Introduction to Gender & Cinema

A study of the representation of gender in relationship to race, sexuality, and class in cinema.   Topics may include stardom, genre, narrative, national cinemas, women and minority filmmakers, and film history.

Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 3317. GE VPA course.

  • TuTh 3:55PM - 5:15PM / Journalism Bldg 300 / Linda Mizejewski,
  • MoWe 11:10AM – 12:30PM / University Hall 082 / Guisela Latorre

 

Screenwriting

 

 

THEATRE 5331 - 0010 : Screenwriting

Exploration of creative script-writing for video/cinema; development of short or feature length scripts. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 636.

  • We Fr 2:20PM - 3:40PM / Drake Center 2038 / Scott Spears (combined section class)
  • We Fr 3:55PM - 5:15PM / Drake Center 2038 / Scott Spears (combined section class)

 

FILMSTD 4880 - 10   Screenwriting and the Business of Cinema

This course examines screenwriting as both a literary art form and a challenging profession. Prereq: Theatre 5331 (636), or permission of instructor. Not open to credit to students with credit for 680.

  • We Fr 9:35AM - 10:55AM / Denney Hall 207 / Andrew Rose

 

FILMSTD 4881 - 10   Screenwriting and the Business of Television

This course examines television writing from both a creative and business perspective. Each student will individually pitch, and then write the show's bible, outline, and pilot. Students learn about teleplay structure, as well as ways to develop intriguing characters, realistic dialogue, and engaging episodes. In small groups students develop, write, and read others' work collectively. Prereq: Theatre 5331 or permission of instructor. Not available to students with credit for 5194 Sp15.

  • We Fr 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Denney Hall 207 / Andrew Rose

 

FILMSTD 4890 - 20   Advanced Screenwriting

An intensive writing course in which each student completes a feature-length screenplay based on work previously completed in Film Studies 680 or Film Studies 4880. Prereq:4880 (680), and permission of director. Not open to students with credit for 690.

  • Mo 2:10PM - 4:45PM / Denney Hall 202 / Angus Fletcher

 

Focus Area and Production Electives

Coming Soon

 

Graduate Courses

ENGLISH 7878.01 - 0010   Seminar in Film & Media Studies

An intensive study of selected issues, themes, and forms in Film & Media Studies. Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with 10 qtr cr hrs for 878 or 6 sem cr hrs for 7878.01 or 7878.02. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.

  • Th 9:10AM – 12:10PM / Denney Hall 205 / Jared Gardner

 

ITALIAN - 8243   Studies in Italian Cinema

Detailed exploration and analysis of selected topics in Italian cinema.

Prereq: Doctorial and MA Candidates or, qualified undergraduates with permission of instructor.

  • We 2:20PM – 5:00PM / Hagerty Hall 206/ Luca Peretti

 

HISTART 5905 - 0010   Avant-Garde Cinema

A survey of significant historical contributions to avant-garde cinema. Prereq: Jr standing. Not open to students with credit for 650.

Lecture: (combined sections)

  • WeFr 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Jennings Hall 140 / Erica Levin
  • WeFr 11:10AM - 12:30PM / Jennings Hall 140 / Erica Levin

 

HISTART 8901 - Cinema Studies

Intensive studies of specific movements, artists, periods and theories of cinema.

Prereq: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 12 cr hrs.

Lecture:

  • Th 2:15PM – 5:00PM / TBA / Erica Levin
Image
Image: Sky Hopinka, Jáaji Approx (2015)

Image: Sky Hopinka, Jáaji Approx (2015)

Course Topic: Traveling Shots: Cinema, Circulation, and Displacement

More than any other art, cinema has the power to unsettle, to induce the disorientation that occurs whenever we find ourselves suddenly elsewhere, far from the comforts of home. As a cultural phenomenon and viewing practice “cinema” itself has become displaced from its familiar surrounds in the darkened movie theater. Moving images are above all mobile, now found streaming online or glimpsed in passing on museum walls, as often as they are seen through well-established networks of theatrical distribution. The journey of the moving image from the cinema screen to other sites and screens far and wide, directly informs the contemporary conditions of migrant subjectivity. This course takes up a wide range of moving images, understood as both the object and agent of that displacement. Case studies include examples of diasporic cinema, experimental documentary, and video art. We will consider how this work makes use of “poor” or degraded images which bear the traces of their own circulation and repeated compression. We will also delve into a range of historical issues related to the global transit of moving images: examining, for example, the film industry’s role in constructing what Lee Grieveson has called the “Highways of Empire.” We will ask how different figures move through cinematic landscapes, taking up the privileged figure of the exile in modernist cinema, alienated and filled with longing, to ask how she is eclipsed, as T.J. Demos argues, by the wandering nomad and the stateless refugee in the 21st century. Together we will work through the challenges of writing about film and time-based art, embracing improvised, unforeseen, and experimental encounters along the way.