Spring 2022 Course Offerings

Body

The most up-to-date meeting times for the courses can be found via the Schedule of Classes on BuckeyeLink.

If you have questions about program/course information, please contact Academic Program Coordinator Paige Piper.92

If you have questions about scheduling and advising, please contact Undergrad Academic Advisor, Emily Carpenter.438

Advanced

Accordion Header
Moving-Image Production Major

Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

MVNGIMG 2202 – Filmmaking Foundations 2 (Lecture + Lab)

  • This course is second in a sequence to introduce moving image production as an artistic, cultural, and multi–modal practice. It focuses on the building blocks of film grammar and offers an introduction to fundamental concepts and tools needed to work in the moving image, grounded in critical and historical context. Students use project–based learning to work independently and collaboratively. PreReq: MVNGIMG 2201

ART 2000 – Encountering Contemporary Art  

  • Readings, lectures, discussions will introduce students to a diverse range of ideas, processes and contexts shaping the experience of visual art today.

ART 2555  Introduction to Digital Photography and Contemporary Issues 

  • (previously 3555). Students will learn fundamental digital camera techniques and explore contemporary and historical issues in photography including the relationships between technique, concept, and aesthetics as well as the relationship between images, identity formation, and larger social structures. PreReq: Not open to students with credit for 3555. GE: Visual and Performing Arts. 
Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

ANIMATION

ACCAD 5001 – Motion Studies Through Hand–Drawn Animation  

  • The principles of animation as demonstrated through hand–drawn animation. The work produced serves as a tool for comprehending the underlying process of any animation technique.

ACCAD 5002 – 3D Computer Animation: Form, Light, Motion I 

  • Overview of 3D computer animation components and stages of production. PreReq: ACCAD 5001 for students enrolled in the MIP (Moving Image Production) program.

ACCAD 5003 – 3D Computer Animation: Form, Light, Motion II  

  • This course provides further exploration of 3D computer animation and stages of production. PreReq: 5002 (or) Instructor Permission.  

DOCUMENTARY

THEATRE 5341 – Studies in Documentary  

  • Exploration of the conceptual, aesthetic, critical, social, ethical, and practical issues in the practice of documentary and reality production of cinema and video works. PreReq: Permission of instructor.

THEATRE 5899 - 0010* – Workshop, Documentary 2 - *Workshop: only 5899 section 0010 - "Documentary" offering with Instructor Michael Kaplan; no other Theatre 5899 topics permitted.

  • Intensive study of documentary for the purpose of developing principles and practices relating to the form. PreReq: Permission of instructor.

EXPERIMENTAL

ART 4009 – Film/Video II: Experimental Strategies 

  • This course is designed as an overview of a broad range of strategies and issues unique to the practice sometimes labeled "experimental film," avant–garde cinema," or "video art." Intermediate theory and practice of creating film/video artwork. Emphasis on personal expression and experimental approaches. PreReq: ART 3009 or MVNGIMG 2201 or 2202, or permission of instructor.  

ART 5019 – Film/Video IV: Topics in Theories and Strategies  

  • A variable–topics film or video production course focused on a conceptual issue or set of issues related to contemporary film and video practice. May focus specifically on film and video in the context of other arts or on issues with relevance outside of the narrowly defined fields of experimental film or video art. PreReq: ART 4009 or permission of instructor.

NARRATIVE

THEATRE 4381 – Introduction to Narrative Filmmaking 

  • This course provides a foundation in the conceptual and technical building blocks of cinematic narrative, emphasizing collaborative projects. Students will investigate the nature of event, character, and place, developing their production and post–production skills in composition, camera movement, lighting, editing, and sound design to support and enhance storytelling. PreReq: Permission of instructor.

THEATRE 5322 – Editorial Process 

  • Exploration of post–production techniques from editorial concepts to outputting video. Students will expand their knowledge of the editorial process and their analytical skills. PreReq for MIP majors: must have completed MVNGIMG 2201 and 2202.

THEATRE 5323 – Video Production 2 

  • Intermediate film/video analysis and production, exploring storytelling in filmmaking through research and project assignments. Individual and group work producing creative projects to strengthen existing skills and gain new insights into camera work, lighting, sound, editing, and more. PreReq: Theatre 5321, or permission of instructor.
Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

MVNGIMG 4200 – Cinema Today [DISTANCE LEARNING, SP 22]

  • Cinematic venues such as the Wexner Center for the Arts present a world-class year-round program of independent filmmaking, international cinema, new documentaries, and classics in Columbus. Building a critical viewing practice is important in the development of filmmakers. This course requires students to view screenings of a curated selection of films and when available, any associated visiting filmmakers’ online discussions of their work. To synthesize these viewings, students will apply elements of film language to films.
Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

MVNGIMG 4502 – Senior Project 2

  • The second of a two–semester experience in which students develop their individual or collaborative capstone project to completion. Students produce a creative work in the areas of animation, documentary, experimental or narrative or combinations of these modes. Group–oriented critiques advance projects to a finalized stage of development. A portfolio of creative work is completed. Required: 18 credit hours of Major Production Studio Courses. MIP Majors, contact Advisor Emily Carpenter.438 for permission to enroll.
Text

MIP Electives: options vary depending on area of interest.

Electives requirement: 2 courses (6 credit hours) at 2000-level or above. 

Please see Academic Advisor Emily Carpenter.438 for elective options. 

Accordion Header
Film Studies Major

Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

English 2263 – Introduction to Film

  • Introduction to methods of reading film texts by analyzing cinema as technique, as system, and as cultural product.
Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

FILMSTD 2271 – Introduction to Film Studies

  • An introduction to the field of Film Studies based on a survey of the major theories of film analysis, specifically geared for incoming majors. PreReq: English 2263 or HistArt 2901. Not open to students with credit for 2270. GE: Visual and Performing Arts.

HISTART 2901 – Intro to World Cinema

  • Chronological survey of the most influential and recognized film artists and film movements of the world.
Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

I. Non-Fictional: Documentary

  • no courses offered this term.

II. Non-Industrial: Experimental / Avant Garde

HISTART 5001: Experiments in Film and Media Theory

  • Film theorist Thomas Elsaesser argues, “theory is never historically stable, but takes on new meanings in different contexts.” In this course, we’ll take his claim as a starting point for exploring different approaches to theorizing film and other moving image media, including formalist and realist film theories, as well as the­ories centered around relationship between screens, perception and the human body. We’ll address how film and media theorists have revisited classical, avant-garde, and ideological theories of spectatorship in light of recent transformations and mobilizations of the moving image. We will also explore the interrelation of (real) reception space and (imaginary) media space, the “ontology of the photographic image,” and “the crisis of the commons.” We will consider how cinema has been understood as an ocular-specular phenom­enon and how more recently it has come to be understood as an immersive perceptual event. In the process of this inquiry, we’ll delve into theoretical accounts of identification, synesthesia, haptic vision, and virtuality, and consider how Third Cinema, animation, and YouTube videos provide opportunities for critically re-eval­uating these different theoretical models and approaches.
Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

HISTART 3901 – World Cinema Today

  • An introduction to the art of international cinema today, including its forms and varied content. In this course, we will look carefully at cinematic form and the socio–political conditions that shape film production across the globe today. At the same time, we will also examine the ideas and fantasies that animate “world cinema” as a label for certain kinds of films. GE: Visual and Performing Arts, GE: Diversity Global Studies.

SLAVIC 3360 – Screening Minorities: Representations of the Other in Slavic Film

  • Film representations of ethnic and religious others in East European cinema. Taught in English.
Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

FRENCH 2801 – Classics of French Cinema

  • Introduction to the study of the cinema and to French film classics. Students will explore cinema as an art form, the social and cultural history of France as it relates to the cinema, and the qualities that make individual films cinematic masterpieces. Taught in English. GE: VPA.

JAPANSE 4400 – Japanese Film and Visual Media

  • An overview of Japanese cinema and visual media, with a focus on genre: canonical and popular works of anime, yakuza film, historical/samurai film, comedies, and documentaries. Taught in English, no Japanese required.
Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

AAAS 4571 – Black Visual Culture and Popular Media 

  • An examination of African Americans in visual culture and the theories of representation in popular media. GE: Visual and Performing Arts, GE: Diversity–Social Diversity in the U.S.

COMPSTD 3607 – Film and Literature as Narrative Art 

  • Relationships between film and literature; emergence of cinematic art as a form of representation with emphasis on diverse cultural traditions. PreReq: English 1110 or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 3607H (358H, 358). GE: Visual and Performing Arts, GE: Diversity Global Studies.

ENGLISH 3378 – Special Topics in Film/Literature: Shakespeare and Film (Instructor: Alan Farmer)

  • Exploration of the most innovative and influential films made of Shakespeare’s plays. Readings of specific plays and film viewings that cut across dramatic genres, time periods, countries, and cinematic styles. We will focus on how directors and actors have chosen to adapt Shakespeare for performance, and consider how these films have shaped the cultural meaning of “Shakespeare” for modern audiences. Requirements will include two essays, several quizzes, a midterm exam, a final exam, regular attendance, and active participation. PreReq: English 1110. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs. GE: Cultures and Ideas.

ENGLISH 4578.20 – Special Topics in Film: "BAD REVIEWS" (SP 22, Instructor: Jesse Schotter)

  • "Bad Reviews" (Spring 2022) will survey a range of classic films from the last fifty years, and screen them in conjunction with bad reviews of them from when they were originally released.  What can we learn--about these films, about their cultural contexts, about the craft of film reviewing--from reading these contrarian takes? Who doesn't like Star Wars? A lot of people, it turns out. Films may include The Empire Strikes Back, They Live, Do the Right Thing, The Graduate, Last Year in Marienbad, The Tree of Life, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, and others. Assignments include two reviews and one critical essay. PreReq: 6 CH English at 2000–3000 level, or permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 4578.30 – Special Topics in Film: "Film and American Society After World War II" (SP 22,  Instructor: Ryan Friedman)

  • This course examines the history of the American cinema in the years immediately following the Second World War, covering the period from 1945 to 1960. We will view and discuss significant Hollywood films from a variety of genres (e.g., comedy, musical, film noir, western, melodrama, social problem film), contextualizing them by reading articles and excerpts published in a variety of venues (e.g., popular magazines, film-trade publications, books of sociology and psychology) during the era in which these films were produced and exhibited. PreReq: 6 CH English at 2000–3000 level, or permission of instructor.

FILMSTD 4895 – Senior Seminar in Film Studies: "Digital Cinema and Embodied Spectators" (SP 22)

  • Today, the vast majority of movies we watch are shot, edited, and screened digitally, and advances in technology allow us to watch movies whenever and wherever we want on a variety of devices and screens. Have we, as embodied spectators, lost anything in this transition to digital film? This course will explore the intersections between our bodies, spectatorship, and digital technologies, as we address current issues in film studies brought on by the shift to digital film. In doing so, we will ground our discussion in our subjective viewing experiences as bodies in the world. We will read classical and contemporary film theory and pay close attention to our viewing environments and technologies as we watch film at local theaters and at home. PreReq: Enrollment in Film Studies major and Senior standing, or permission of instructor. 

FRENCH 2801 – Classics of French Cinema

  • Introduction to the study of the cinema and to French film classics. Students will explore cinema as an art form, the social and cultural history of France as it relates to the cinema, and the qualities that make individual films cinematic masterpieces. Taught in English. GE: VPA.

ITALIAN 2053 – Introduction to Italian Cinema  

  • Survey of the Italian cinema from the beginnings to today, with special emphasis on neorealism. Taught in English. PreReq: Not open to students with credit for 221. GE: Visual and Performing Arts, GE: Diversity Global Studies.

ITALIAN 2055 – Mafia Movies 

  • In this course, students watch Italian and American mafia movie and television hits and explore the myth of the Mafia that is so widespread in America and trace its history as it passes across time and through multiple cultures. Taught in English. GE: Visual Performing Arts, GE: Diversity Global Studies. 

HISTART 3901 – World Cinema Today

  • An introduction to the art of international cinema today, including its forms and varied content. In this course, we will look carefully at cinematic form and the socio–political conditions that shape film production across the globe today. At the same time, we will also examine the ideas and fantasies that animate “world cinema” as a label for certain kinds of films. GE: Visual and Performing Arts, GE: Diversity Global Studies.

HISTART 4901 – Classic Film Theories

  • Study of historically important theories of film art. PreReq: Soph standing, or permission of instructor.

JAPANSE 4400 – Japanese Film and Visual Culture 

  • An overview of Japanese cinema and visual media, with a focus on genre: canonical and popular works of anime, yakuza film, historical/samurai film, comedies, and documentaries. Taught in English, no Japanese required.

MUSIC 3344 – Film Music

  • A study of how music has functioned in film across its century-long history, as produced in Hollywood and in other countries, and by filmmakers independent of the studio system. PreReq: English 1110 or 1111. GE: VPA

SLAVIC 3310 – Science Fiction: East vs. West

  • Slavic, American, and British sci–fi on page and screen as reflection of major cultural concerns: progress, utopia, human perfectibility, limits of science and knowledge, gender, identity. Taught in English. GE: Visual and Performing Arts, GE: Diversity Global Studies

SLAVIC 3360 – Screening Minorities in Slavic Film 

  • Film representations of ethnic and religious others in East European cinema. Taught in English.

WGSST 2317 – Intro to Gender & Cinema (previously 3317)

  • A study of the representation of gender in relationship to race, sexuality, and class in cinema. Topics may include stardom, genre, narrative, national cinemas, women and minority filmmakers, and film history. PreReq: Not open to students with credit for 3317. GE: Visual and Performing Arts course.
Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

FILMSTD 4895 – Senior Seminar in Film Studies: "Digital Cinema and Embodied Spectators" (SP 22)

  • Today, the vast majority of movies we watch are shot, edited, and screened digitally, and advances in technology allow us to watch movies whenever and wherever we want on a variety of devices and screens. Have we, as embodied spectators, lost anything in this transition to digital film? This course will explore the intersections between our bodies, spectatorship, and digital technologies, as we address current issues in film studies brought on by the shift to digital film. In doing so, we will ground our discussion in our subjective viewing experiences as bodies in the world. We will read classical and contemporary film theory and pay close attention to our viewing environments and technologies as we watch film at local theaters and at home. PreReq: Enrollment in Film Studies major and Senior standing, or permission of instructor. 
Text

FILM STUDIES MAJOR FOCUS AREA COURSES – SP 22:

FS Focus Area: Production (Film Studies Focus Area -- FS majors only; list is not for MIP students)
ACCAD 5001: Motion Studies Through hand-Drawn Animation
ACCAD 5002: 3D Computer Animation: Form, Light and Motion 1
ACCAD 5003: 3D Computer Animation: Form, Light, and Motion 2
ACCAD 5102: Programming Concepts for Artists and Designers
ACCAD 5141: Interactive Arts Media
ART 2555: Photography I - Digital Camera
ART 3009: Film/Video I: Technologies and Analysis
ART 4009: Film/Video II: Experimental Strategies  
ART 4101: Moving Image Art
ART 4201: New Media Art
ART 5019: Film/Video IV: Topics in Theories and Strategies
DANCE 3401: Dance in Popular Culture
DANCE 4193: Independent Studies
DANCE 4805: Interdisciplinary Performance
DANCE 5211: Dance-Film 1
FILMSTD 4191: Internship / Field Work
MVNGIMG 2201: Filmmaking Foundation 2
MVNGIMG 2202: Filmmaking Foundation 2  
THEATRE 2341H: Moving Image Art (Honors)
THEATRE 4000.03: Practicum - Video
THEATRE 5321: Video Production 1
THEATRE 5322: Editorial Process  
THEATRE 5323: Video Production 2  
THEATRE 5341: Studies in the Documentary


FS Focus Area: Screenwriting
FILMSTD 4880: Screenwriting and the Business of Cinema – Film 
FILMSTD 4881: Screenwriting and the Business of Cinema – Television  
FILMSTD 4890: Advanced Screenwriting 
THEATRE 5331: Screenwriting


FS Focus Area: Film Theory
AAAS 4571: Black Visual Culture and Popular Media  
COMPSTD 3607: Film and Literature as Narrative Art 
ENGLISH 4578.20: Special Topics in Film / "Bad Reviews" (SP 22)  
ENGLISH 4578.30: Special Topics in Film / "Film and American Society After WWII" (SP 22)  
FILMSTD 4895: Senior Seminar in Film Studies
FILMSTD 4998: Undergraduate Research 
FILMSTD 4999: Distinction Project  
FILMSTD 4999H: Honors Thesis Research   
FRENCH 2801: Classics of French Cinema 
HISTART 3901: World Cinema Today 
HISTART 4901: Classic Film Theories 
ITALIAN 2053: Introduction to Italian Cinema 
ITALIAN 2055: Mafia Movies
JAPANSE 4400: Japanese Film and Visual Culture 
SLAVIC 3310: Science Fiction: East vs. West 
SLAVIC 3360: Screening Minorities: Representations of the Other in Slavic Film 
WGSST 3317: Hollywood, Women and Film 

Accordion Header
Film Studies Minor

Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

ENGLISH 2263 – Introduction to Film 

  • Introduction to methods of reading film texts by analyzing cinema as technique, as system, and as cultural product.

FILMSTD 2271 – Introduction to Film Studies

  • An introduction to the field of Film Studies based on a survey of the major theories of film analysis, specifically geared for incoming majors. PreReq: English 2263 or HistArt 2901. Not open to students with credit for 2270. GE: Visual and Performing Arts.

HISTART 2901 – Intro to World Cinema

  • Chronological survey of the most influential and recognized film artists and film movements of the world.

WGSST 2317 Introduction to Gender & Cinema  

  • A study of the representation of gender in relationship to race, sexuality, and class in cinema. Topics may include stardom, genre, narrative, national cinemas, women and minority filmmakers, and film history. PreReq: Not open to students with credit for 3317. GE: Visual and Performing Arts course.
Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

AAAS 4571 – Black Visual Culture and Popular Media 

  • An examination of African Americans in visual culture and the theories of representation in popular media. GE: Visual and Performing Arts, GE: Diversity–Social Diversity in the U.S.

COMPSTD 3607 – Film and Literature as Narrative Art 

  • Relationships between film and literature; emergence of cinematic art as a form of representation with emphasis on diverse cultural traditions. PreReq: English 1110 or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 3607H (358H, 358). GE: Visual and Performing Arts, GE: Diversity Global Studies.

ENGLISH 2263 – Introduction to Film

Introduction to methods of reading film texts by analyzing cinema as technique, as system, and as cultural product.

ENGLISH 3378 – Special Topics in Film/Literature: Shakespeare and Film (Instructor: Alan Farmer)

  • Exploration of the most innovative and influential films made of Shakespeare’s plays. Readings of specific plays and film viewings that cut across dramatic genres, time periods, countries, and cinematic styles. We will focus on how directors and actors have chosen to adapt Shakespeare for performance, and consider how these films have shaped the cultural meaning of “Shakespeare” for modern audiences. Requirements will include two essays, several quizzes, a midterm exam, a final exam, regular attendance, and active participation. PreReq: English 1110. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs. GE: Cultures and Ideas.

ENGLISH 4578.20 – Special Topics in Film: "BAD REVIEWS" (SP 22, Instructor: Jesse Schotter)

  • "Bad Reviews" (Spring 2022) will survey a range of classic films from the last fifty years, and screen them in conjunction with bad reviews of them from when they were originally released.  What can we learn--about these films, about their cultural contexts, about the craft of film reviewing--from reading these contrarian takes? Who doesn't like Star Wars? A lot of people, it turns out. Films may include The Empire Strikes Back, They Live, Do the Right Thing, The Graduate, Last Year in Marienbad, The Tree of Life, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, and others. Assignments include two reviews and one critical essay. PreReq: 6 CH English at 2000–3000 level, or permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 4578.30 – Special Topics in Film: "Film and American Society After World War II" (SP 22,  Instructor: Ryan Friedman)

  • This course examines the history of the American cinema in the years immediately following the Second World War, covering the period from 1945 to 1960. We will view and discuss significant Hollywood films from a variety of genres (e.g., comedy, musical, film noir, western, melodrama, social problem film), contextualizing them by reading articles and excerpts published in a variety of venues (e.g., popular magazines, film-trade publications, books of sociology and psychology) during the era in which these films were produced and exhibited. PreReq: 6 CH English at 2000–3000 level, or permission of instructor.

FILMSTD 2271 – Introduction to Film Studies for majors

  • An introduction to the field of Film Studies based on a survey of the major theories of film analysis, specifically geared for incoming majors. PreReq: English 2263 or HistArt 2901. Not open to students with credit for 2270. GE: Visual and Performing Arts.

FILMSTD 4895 – Senior Seminar in Film Studies: "Digital Cinema and Embodied Spectators" (SP 22)

  • Today, the vast majority of movies we watch are shot, edited, and screened digitally, and advances in technology allow us to watch movies whenever and wherever we want on a variety of devices and screens. Have we, as embodied spectators, lost anything in this transition to digital film? This course will explore the intersections between our bodies, spectatorship, and digital technologies, as we address current issues in film studies brought on by the shift to digital film. In doing so, we will ground our discussion in our subjective viewing experiences as bodies in the world. We will read classical and contemporary film theory and pay close attention to our viewing environments and technologies as we watch film at local theaters and at home. PreReq: Enrollment in Film Studies major and Senior standing, or permission of instructor. 

FRENCH 2801 – Classics of French Cinema

  • Introduction to the study of the cinema and to French film classics. Students will explore cinema as an art form, the social and cultural history of France as it relates to the cinema, and the qualities that make individual films cinematic masterpieces. Taught in English. GE: VPA.

ITALIAN 2053 – Introduction to Italian Cinema  

  • Survey of the Italian cinema from the beginnings to today, with special emphasis on neorealism. Taught in English. PreReq: Not open to students with credit for 221. GE: Visual and Performing Arts, GE: Diversity Global Studies.

ITALIAN 2055 – Mafia Movies 

  • In this course, students watch Italian and American mafia movie and television hits and explore the myth of the Mafia that is so widespread in America and trace its history as it passes across time and through multiple cultures. Taught in English. GE: Visual Performing Arts, GE: Diversity Global Studies. 

HISTART 2901 – Introduction to World Cinema

  • Chronological survey of the most influential and recognized film artists and film movements of the world.

HISTART 3901 – World Cinema Today

  • An introduction to the art of international cinema today, including its forms and varied content. In this course, we will look carefully at cinematic form and the socio–political conditions that shape film production across the globe today. At the same time, we will also examine the ideas and fantasies that animate “world cinema” as a label for certain kinds of films. GE: Visual and Performing Arts, GE: Diversity Global Studies.

HISTART 4901 – Classic Film Theories

  • Study of historically important theories of film art. PreReq: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor.

JAPANSE 4400 – Japanese Film and Visual Culture

  • An overview of Japanese cinema and visual media, with a focus on genre: canonical and popular works of anime, yakuza film, historical/samurai film, comedies, and documentaries. Taught in English, no Japanese required.

MUSIC 3344 – Film Music

  • A study of how music has functioned in film across its century-long history, as produced in Hollywood and in other countries, and by filmmakers independent of the studio system. PreReq: English 1110 or 1111. GE: VPA

SLAVIC 3310 – Science Fiction: East vs. West

  • Slavic, American, and British sci–fi on page and screen as reflection of major cultural concerns: progress, utopia, human perfectibility, limits of science and knowledge, gender, identity. Taught in English. GE: Visual and Performing Arts, GE: Diversity Global Studies

SLAVIC 3360 – Screening Minorities in Slavic Film

  • Film representations of ethnic and religious others in East European cinema. Taught in English.

WGSST 2317 – Intro to Gender & Cinema 

  • A study of the representation of gender in relationship to race, sexuality, and class in cinema. Topics may include stardom, genre, narrative, national cinemas, women and minority filmmakers, and film history. PreReq: Not open to students with credit for 3317. GE: Visual and Performing Arts course.

Accordion Header
Screenwriting Minor

Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

ENGLISH 2263 – Introduction to Film 

  • Introduction to methods of reading film texts by analyzing cinema as technique, as system, and as cultural product.

FILMSTD 2271 – Introduction to Film Studies

  • An introduction to the field of Film Studies based on a survey of the major theories of film analysis, specifically geared for incoming majors. PreReq: English 2263 or HistArt 2901. Not open to students with credit for 2270. GE: Visual and Performing Arts.

HISTART 2901 – Intro to World Cinema

  • Chronological survey of the most influential and recognized film artists and film movements of the world.
Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

ENGLISH 2220 – Introduction to Shakespeare

  • Introduction to Shakespeare through the study of selected plays designed to give an understanding of drama as theatrical art and as an interpretation of fundamental human experience. 

ENGLISH 2261 – Introduction to Fiction

  • Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included. PreReq: ENG 1110.01 or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 2261H. GE: Lit.

ENGLISH 2265 – Introductory Fiction Writing

  • Introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft and composition of fiction writing. Students will write short stories and provide feedback in the form of workshops during which we will analyze and discuss student work. We will also study published stories by well–regarded authors. PreReq: ENG 1110.

ENGLISH 2268 – Introductory Creative Nonfiction Writing

  • An introduction to the fundamentals of technique, craft, and composition; practice in the writing of creative nonfiction; and analysis and discussion of student work as well as published essays by masters of the many forms of creative nonfiction. PreReq: ENG 1110.

ENGLISH 2269 – Digital Media Composing

  • Composition course in which students analyze and compose digital media texts while studying complex forms and practices of textual production. PreReq: ENG 1110.01 or equiv. GE: VPA.
Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

FILMSTD 4895 – Senior Seminar in Film Studies: "Digital Cinema and Embodied Spectators" (SP 22)

  • Today, the vast majority of movies we watch are shot, edited, and screened digitally, and advances in technology allow us to watch movies whenever and wherever we want on a variety of devices and screens. Have we, as embodied spectators, lost anything in this transition to digital film? This course will explore the intersections between our bodies, spectatorship, and digital technologies, as we address current issues in film studies brought on by the shift to digital film. In doing so, we will ground our discussion in our subjective viewing experiences as bodies in the world. We will read classical and contemporary film theory and pay close attention to our viewing environments and technologies as we watch film at local theaters and at home. PreReq: Enrollment in Film Studies major and Senior standing, or permission of instructor. 
Text

Courses offered in SP 22: 

I. Introduction to Development

  • no course offered this term

II. Introduction to Screenwriting

THEATRE 5331: Screenwriting

  • Exploration of creative scriptwriting for video/cinema; development of short or feature length scripts. PreReq: Permission of instructor. 

III. Business of Screenwriting

FILM STUDIES 4880: Screenwriting and the Business of Cinema 

  • This course examines screenwriting as both a literary art form and a challenging profession.  Each student will take an original premise for a movie and develop it into a logline, a treatment, a step outline, and ultimately, a polished first act of a feature–length screenplay. In addition, this class will teach the essentials necessary to succeed in the highly competitive world of professional screenwriting, discussing types of deals available to a scriptwriter, Writers Guild rules and regulations, how to pitch a story, ways to attain literary representation and more.  PreReq: Theatre 5331, or permission of instructor.

FILM STUDIES 4881: Screenwriting and the Business of Television

  • This course examines television writing from both a creative and business perspective. Each student will individually pitch an idea for an original half–hour TV series to the class, and then write the show’s bible, outline, and pilot. In addition, students will work in small groups to collectively develop and write the bible and pilot of an hour–long TV series. Finally, students will learn how shows are created at the various networks, the different seasons of development, a writer’s role on a TV series, and the types of deals available to writers in the TV business. PreReq: Theatre 5331 or permission of instructor.

Accordion Header
Graduate Interdisciplinary Specialization

Text

Graduate Coursework for GIS, SP 22: 

ENGLISH 4578.20 - Special Topics in Film (Instructor: Jesse Schotter)

  • Examination of particular topics, themes, genres, or movements in cinema; topics may include particular directors, periods, genres. PreReq: 6 CH English at 2000–3000 level, or permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 4578.30 - Special Topics in Film (Instructor: Ryan Friedman)

  • Examination of particular topics, themes, genres, or movements in cinema; topics may include particular directors, periods, genres. PreReq: 6 CH English at 2000–3000 level, or permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 7878.01 Seminar in Film & Media Studies 

  • Intensive study of selected issues, themes, and forms in Film & Media Studies. PreReq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 CH.

HISTART 4901 Classic Film Theory 

  • Study of historically important theories of film art. PreReq: Soph standing, or permission of instructor.